Experimental evaluation of different chordal preservation methods during mitral valve replacement

Marc R. Moon, Abelardo DeAnda, George T. Daughters, Neil B. Ingels, D. Craig Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During chordal-sparing mitral valve replacement (MVR), some recommend anatomic reattachment of the anterior leaflet chordae to the anterior annulus; others advocate shifting the chordae to the posterior annulus. To compare the results of these techniques with those of conventional MVR (total chordal excision), 21 dogs were studied 5 to 12 days after implantation of tantalum markers to measure left ventricular volume and geometry. One to 3 weeks later, animals underwent conventional MVR (n = 7) or chordal-sparing MVR with either anterior chordal reattachment (n = 7) or posterior transposition (n = 7). Contractility was assessed using physiologic volume intercepts for end-systolic elastance, preload recruitable stroke work, and the relationship of the maximum rate of change of left ventricular pressure to the cnd-diastolic volume. The physiologic intercept for end-systolic elastance did not change after anterior or posterior MVR, but increased from 60 ± 14 mL before MVR to 72 ± 17 mL with conventional MVR (p <0.002), indicating impaired left ventricular contractility. Similarly, the physiologic intercept for preload recruitable stroke work and the relationship of the maximum rate of change of left ventricular pressure to the end-diastolic volume increased 22% ± 13% and 28% ± 13%, respectively, after conventional MVR, but neither changed after anterior or posterior MVR. Although the end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship did not change with either chordal-sparing technique, its slope increased 98% ± 73% after conventional MVR (p <0.008). Thus, although chordal preservation maintained better systolic and diastolic function, there was no substantial difference between the results of the anterior and posterior chordal-sparing techniques in this model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)931-944
Number of pages14
JournalThe Annals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume58
Issue number4
StatePublished - Oct 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Mitral Valve
Ventricular Pressure
Stroke
Tantalum
Dogs
Blood Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Experimental evaluation of different chordal preservation methods during mitral valve replacement. / Moon, Marc R.; DeAnda, Abelardo; Daughters, George T.; Ingels, Neil B.; Miller, D. Craig.

In: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 58, No. 4, 10.1994, p. 931-944.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moon, Marc R. ; DeAnda, Abelardo ; Daughters, George T. ; Ingels, Neil B. ; Miller, D. Craig. / Experimental evaluation of different chordal preservation methods during mitral valve replacement. In: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 1994 ; Vol. 58, No. 4. pp. 931-944.
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