Experimental infection of potential reservoir hosts with venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Mexico

Eleanor R. Deardorff, Naomi L. Forrester, Amelia P. Travassos Da Rosa, Jose G. Estrada-Franco, Roberto Navarro-Lopez, Robert B. Tesh, Scott Weaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 1993, an outbreak of encephalitis among 125 affected equids in coastal Chiapas, Mexico, resulted in a 50% case-fatality rate. The outbreak was attributed to Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) subtype IE, not previously associated with equine disease and death. To better understand the ecology of this VEEV strain in Chiapas, we experimentally infected 5 species of wild rodents and evaluated their competence as reservoir and amplifying hosts. Rodents from 1 species (Baiomys musculus) showed signs of disease and died by day 8 postinoculation. Rodents from the 4 other species (Liomys salvini, Oligoryzomys fulves-cens, Oryzomys couesi, and Sigmodon hispidus) became viremic but survived and developed neutralizing antibodies, indicating that multiple species may contribute to VEEV maintenance. By infecting numerous rodent species and producing adequate viremia, VEEV may increase its chances of long-term persistence in nature and could increase risk for establishment in disease-endemic areas and amplification outside the disease-endemic range.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)519-525
Number of pages7
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

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Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Viruses
Mexico
Rodentia
Sigmodontinae
Endemic Diseases
Infection
Disease Outbreaks
Horse Diseases
Viremia
Encephalitis
Neutralizing Antibodies
Ecology
Mental Competency
Maintenance
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Deardorff, E. R., Forrester, N. L., Travassos Da Rosa, A. P., Estrada-Franco, J. G., Navarro-Lopez, R., Tesh, R. B., & Weaver, S. (2009). Experimental infection of potential reservoir hosts with venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Mexico. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 15(4), 519-525. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1504.081008

Experimental infection of potential reservoir hosts with venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Mexico. / Deardorff, Eleanor R.; Forrester, Naomi L.; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P.; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 15, No. 4, 04.2009, p. 519-525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Deardorff, ER, Forrester, NL, Travassos Da Rosa, AP, Estrada-Franco, JG, Navarro-Lopez, R, Tesh, RB & Weaver, S 2009, 'Experimental infection of potential reservoir hosts with venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Mexico', Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 15, no. 4, pp. 519-525. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1504.081008
Deardorff ER, Forrester NL, Travassos Da Rosa AP, Estrada-Franco JG, Navarro-Lopez R, Tesh RB et al. Experimental infection of potential reservoir hosts with venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Mexico. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009 Apr;15(4):519-525. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1504.081008
Deardorff, Eleanor R. ; Forrester, Naomi L. ; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P. ; Estrada-Franco, Jose G. ; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto ; Tesh, Robert B. ; Weaver, Scott. / Experimental infection of potential reservoir hosts with venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Mexico. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2009 ; Vol. 15, No. 4. pp. 519-525.
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