Experimental infection with and maintenance of cell fusing agent virus (Flavivirus) in aedes aegypti

Maria Angelica Contreras-Gutierrez, Hilda Guzman, Saravanan Thangamani, Nikos Vasilakis, Robert B. Tesh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the past two decades, there has been a dramatic increase in the recognition and characterization of novel insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFVs). Some of these agents are closely related to important mosquito-borne flavivirus pathogens. Results of experimental studies suggest that mosquitoes and mosquito cell cultures infected with someISFVs are refractory to superinfection with related flavivirus pathogens; and it has been proposed that ISFVs potentially could be used to alter the vector competence of mosquitoes and reduce transmission of specific flavivirus pathogens, such as dengue, West Nile, or Zika viruses. In order for an ISFV to be used in such a control strategy, the virus would have to be vertically transmitted at a high rate in the target vector population to insure its continued maintenance. This study compared the vertical transmission rates of an ISFV, cell fusing agent virus (CFAV), in two Aedes aegypti colonies: One naturally infected with CFAV and the other experimentally infected but previously free of the virus. CFAV filial infection rates in progeny of female mosquitoes from both colonies were > 90% after two generations of selection, indicating the feasibility of introducing an ISFV into a mosquito population. This and other considerations for evaluating the feasibility of using ISFVs as an arbovirus control strategy are discussed

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-304
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume97
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

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Flavivirus
Aedes
Maintenance
Viruses
Insects
Culicidae
Infection
Arboviruses
West Nile virus
Superinfection
Dengue
Health Services Needs and Demand
Virus Diseases
Mental Competency
Cell Culture Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Experimental infection with and maintenance of cell fusing agent virus (Flavivirus) in aedes aegypti. / Contreras-Gutierrez, Maria Angelica; Guzman, Hilda; Thangamani, Saravanan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Tesh, Robert B.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 97, No. 1, 2017, p. 299-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Contreras-Gutierrez, Maria Angelica ; Guzman, Hilda ; Thangamani, Saravanan ; Vasilakis, Nikos ; Tesh, Robert B. / Experimental infection with and maintenance of cell fusing agent virus (Flavivirus) in aedes aegypti. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2017 ; Vol. 97, No. 1. pp. 299-304.
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