Experimental models for leishmaniasis and for testing anti-leishmanial vaccines

M. Hommel, C. L. Jaffe, Bruno Travi, G. Milon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In public health terms, leishmaniases are diseases of humans and dogs, whereas, in epidemiological terms, Leishmania spp. are considered to represent infections of a wide variety of animals, which represent the natural reservoirs of the various parasite species involved. Humans and dogs (which may be considered secondary or 'accidental' hosts in the leishmanial life-cycle) often exhibit severe clinical signs and symptoms when infected, whereas reservoir hosts generally show a few, minor or no signs. This situation makes the definition of a suitable laboratory model a difficult one, since the various experimental hosts may behave either like a reservoir or an accidental host. This review discusses the concept of animal models for leishmaniases and provides a critical evaluation of the most common experimental models and their respective advantages and disadvantages. In this state-of-the-art review, particular emphasis is given to the value of using mouse, hamster, cotton-rat, dog and primate models, especially in the context of testing potential anti-leishmanial vaccines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-73
Number of pages19
JournalAnnals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology
Volume89
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Leishmaniasis
Theoretical Models
Vaccines
Dogs
Sigmodontinae
Dog Diseases
Leishmania
Life Cycle Stages
Cricetinae
Primates
Signs and Symptoms
Parasites
Animal Models
Public Health
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology

Cite this

Experimental models for leishmaniasis and for testing anti-leishmanial vaccines. / Hommel, M.; Jaffe, C. L.; Travi, Bruno; Milon, G.

In: Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology, Vol. 89, No. SUPPL. 1, 1995, p. 55-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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