Experimental transmission of Mayaro virus by Aedes aegypti

Kanya C. Long, Sarah A. Ziegler, Saravanan Thangamani, Nicole L. Hausser, Tadeusz J. Kochel, Stephen Higgs, Robert B. Tesh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Outbreaks of Mayaro fever have been associated with a sylvatic cycle of Mayaro virus (MAYV) transmission in South America. To evaluate the potential for a common urban mosquito to transmit MAYV, laboratory vector competence studies were performed with Aedes aegypti from Iquitos, Peru. Oral infection in Ae. aegypti ranged from 0% (0/31) to 84% (31/37), with blood meal virus titers between 3.4 log 10 and 7.3 log 10 plaque-forming units (PFU)/mL. Transmission of MAYV by 70% (21/30) of infected mosquitoes was shown by saliva collection and exposure to suckling mice. Amount of viral RNA in febrile humans, determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, ranged from 2.7 to 5.3 log 10 PFU equivalents/mL. Oral susceptibility of Ae. aegypti to MAYV at titers encountered in viremic humans may limit opportunities to initiate an urban cycle; however, transmission of MAYV by Ae. aegypti shows the vector competence of this species and suggests potential for urban transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)750-757
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume85
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Aedes
Viruses
Culicidae
Viral Load
Mental Competency
Fever
Peru
South America
Viral RNA
Saliva
Disease Outbreaks
Meals
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Long, K. C., Ziegler, S. A., Thangamani, S., Hausser, N. L., Kochel, T. J., Higgs, S., & Tesh, R. B. (2011). Experimental transmission of Mayaro virus by Aedes aegypti. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 85(4), 750-757. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.2011.11-0359

Experimental transmission of Mayaro virus by Aedes aegypti. / Long, Kanya C.; Ziegler, Sarah A.; Thangamani, Saravanan; Hausser, Nicole L.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Higgs, Stephen; Tesh, Robert B.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 85, No. 4, 10.2011, p. 750-757.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Long, KC, Ziegler, SA, Thangamani, S, Hausser, NL, Kochel, TJ, Higgs, S & Tesh, RB 2011, 'Experimental transmission of Mayaro virus by Aedes aegypti', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 85, no. 4, pp. 750-757. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.2011.11-0359
Long KC, Ziegler SA, Thangamani S, Hausser NL, Kochel TJ, Higgs S et al. Experimental transmission of Mayaro virus by Aedes aegypti. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2011 Oct;85(4):750-757. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.2011.11-0359
Long, Kanya C. ; Ziegler, Sarah A. ; Thangamani, Saravanan ; Hausser, Nicole L. ; Kochel, Tadeusz J. ; Higgs, Stephen ; Tesh, Robert B. / Experimental transmission of Mayaro virus by Aedes aegypti. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2011 ; Vol. 85, No. 4. pp. 750-757.
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