Experimental yellow fever virus infection in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). I. Virologic, biochemical, and immunologic studies

R. B. Tesh, H. Guzman, A. P A Travassos da Rosa, P. F C Vasconcelos, L. B. Dias, J. E. Bunnell, H. Zhang, S. Y. Xiao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

This report describes the clinical laboratory findings in golden hamsters experimentally infected with yellow fever (YF) virus. An accompanying paper describes the pathologic findings. Following intraperitoneal inoculation of a virulent strain of YF virus, hamsters developed a high-titered viremia (up to 109/mL) lasting 5-6 days and abnormal liver function tests. YF hemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies appeared 4 or 5 days after infection, often while viremia was still present. The mortality rate in YF-infected hamsters was variable, depending on the virus strain and the age of the animals. Clinical and pathologic changes in the infected hamsters were very similar to those described in experimentally infected macaques and in fatal human cases of YF, which indicates that the golden hamster may be an excellent alternative animal model, in place of nonhuman primates, for research on the pathogenesis and treatment of YF and other viscerotropic flavivirus diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1431-1436
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume183
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2001

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Yellow fever virus
Yellow Fever
Mesocricetus
Virus Diseases
Cricetinae
Viremia
Flavivirus
Liver Function Tests
Hemagglutination
Macaca
Primates
Animal Models
Viruses
Mortality
Antibodies
Infection
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Tesh, R. B., Guzman, H., Travassos da Rosa, A. P. A., Vasconcelos, P. F. C., Dias, L. B., Bunnell, J. E., ... Xiao, S. Y. (2001). Experimental yellow fever virus infection in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). I. Virologic, biochemical, and immunologic studies. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 183(10), 1431-1436. https://doi.org/10.1086/320199

Experimental yellow fever virus infection in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). I. Virologic, biochemical, and immunologic studies. / Tesh, R. B.; Guzman, H.; Travassos da Rosa, A. P A; Vasconcelos, P. F C; Dias, L. B.; Bunnell, J. E.; Zhang, H.; Xiao, S. Y.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 183, No. 10, 15.05.2001, p. 1431-1436.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tesh, RB, Guzman, H, Travassos da Rosa, APA, Vasconcelos, PFC, Dias, LB, Bunnell, JE, Zhang, H & Xiao, SY 2001, 'Experimental yellow fever virus infection in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). I. Virologic, biochemical, and immunologic studies', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 183, no. 10, pp. 1431-1436. https://doi.org/10.1086/320199
Tesh, R. B. ; Guzman, H. ; Travassos da Rosa, A. P A ; Vasconcelos, P. F C ; Dias, L. B. ; Bunnell, J. E. ; Zhang, H. ; Xiao, S. Y. / Experimental yellow fever virus infection in the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus). I. Virologic, biochemical, and immunologic studies. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2001 ; Vol. 183, No. 10. pp. 1431-1436.
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