Exploring the unrealized potential of computer-aided drafting

Suresh Bhavnani, Bonnie E. John

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite huge investments by vendors and users, CAD productivity remains disappointing. Our analysis of real-world CAD usage shows that even after many years of experience, users tend to use suboptimal strategies to perform complex CAD tasks. Additionally, some of these strategies have a marked resemblance to manual drafting techniques. Although this phenomenon has been previously reported, this paper explores explanations for its causes and persistence. We argue that the strategic knowledge to use CAD effectively is neither defined nor explicitly taught. In the absence of a well-formed strategy, users often develop a synthetic mental model of CAD containing a mixture of manual and CAD methods. As these suboptimal strategies do not necessarily prevent users from producing clean, accurate drawings, the inefficiencies tend to remain unrecognized and users have little motivation to develop better strategies. To reverse this situation we recommend that the strategic knowledge to use CAD effectively should be made explicit and provided early in training. We use our analysis to begin the process of making this strategic knowledge explicit. We conclude by discussing the ramifications of this research in training as well as in the development of future computer aids for drawing and design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
Place of PublicationNew York, NY, United States
PublisherACM
Pages332-339
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1996 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 96 - Vancouver, BC, Can
Duration: Apr 13 1996Apr 18 1996

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1996 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 96
CityVancouver, BC, Can
Period4/13/964/18/96

Fingerprint

CAD
Computer aided design
knowledge
persistence
Productivity
productivity
cause
experience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Bhavnani, S., & John, B. E. (1996). Exploring the unrealized potential of computer-aided drafting. In Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings (pp. 332-339). New York, NY, United States: ACM.

Exploring the unrealized potential of computer-aided drafting. / Bhavnani, Suresh; John, Bonnie E.

Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. New York, NY, United States : ACM, 1996. p. 332-339.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bhavnani, S & John, BE 1996, Exploring the unrealized potential of computer-aided drafting. in Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. ACM, New York, NY, United States, pp. 332-339, Proceedings of the 1996 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 96, Vancouver, BC, Can, 4/13/96.
Bhavnani S, John BE. Exploring the unrealized potential of computer-aided drafting. In Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. New York, NY, United States: ACM. 1996. p. 332-339
Bhavnani, Suresh ; John, Bonnie E. / Exploring the unrealized potential of computer-aided drafting. Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings. New York, NY, United States : ACM, 1996. pp. 332-339
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