Extreme fitness differences in mammalian and insect hosts after continuous replication of vesicular stomatitis virus in sandfly cells

I. S. Novella, D. K. Clarke, J. Quer, E. A. Duarte, C. H. Lee, Scott Weaver, S. F. Elena, A. Moya, E. Domingo, J. J. Holland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Continuous, persistent replication of a wild-type strain of vesicular stomatitis virus in cultured sandfly cells for 10 months profoundly decreased virus replicative fitness in mammalian cells and greatly increased fitness in sandfly cells. After persistent infection of sandfly cells, fitness was over 2,000,000-fold greater than that in mammalian cells, indicating extreme selective differences in the environmental conditions provided by insect and mammalian cells. The sandfly-adapted virus also showed extremely low fitness in mouse brain cells (comparable to that in mammalian cell cultures). It also showed an attenuated phenotype, requiring a nearly millionfold higher intracranial dose than that of its parent clone to kill mice. A single passage of this adapted virus in BHK-21 cells at 37°C restored fitness to near neutrality and also restored mouse neurovirulence. These results clearly illustrate the enormous capacity of RNA viruses to adapt to changing selective environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6805-6809
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume69
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Vesiculovirus
Psychodidae
Vesicular Stomatitis
Phlebotominae
Insects
Viruses
insects
cells
viruses
mice
RNA Viruses
Cultured Cells
Clone Cells
Cell Culture Techniques
cell culture
Phenotype
clones
brain
phenotype
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Novella, I. S., Clarke, D. K., Quer, J., Duarte, E. A., Lee, C. H., Weaver, S., ... Holland, J. J. (1995). Extreme fitness differences in mammalian and insect hosts after continuous replication of vesicular stomatitis virus in sandfly cells. Journal of Virology, 69(11), 6805-6809.

Extreme fitness differences in mammalian and insect hosts after continuous replication of vesicular stomatitis virus in sandfly cells. / Novella, I. S.; Clarke, D. K.; Quer, J.; Duarte, E. A.; Lee, C. H.; Weaver, Scott; Elena, S. F.; Moya, A.; Domingo, E.; Holland, J. J.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 69, No. 11, 1995, p. 6805-6809.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Novella, IS, Clarke, DK, Quer, J, Duarte, EA, Lee, CH, Weaver, S, Elena, SF, Moya, A, Domingo, E & Holland, JJ 1995, 'Extreme fitness differences in mammalian and insect hosts after continuous replication of vesicular stomatitis virus in sandfly cells', Journal of Virology, vol. 69, no. 11, pp. 6805-6809.
Novella, I. S. ; Clarke, D. K. ; Quer, J. ; Duarte, E. A. ; Lee, C. H. ; Weaver, Scott ; Elena, S. F. ; Moya, A. ; Domingo, E. ; Holland, J. J. / Extreme fitness differences in mammalian and insect hosts after continuous replication of vesicular stomatitis virus in sandfly cells. In: Journal of Virology. 1995 ; Vol. 69, No. 11. pp. 6805-6809.
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