Factors associated with burnout amongst healthcare workers providing HIV care in Malawi

Maria H. Kim, Alick C. Mazenga, Xiaoying Yu, Katie Simon, Phoebe Nyasulu, Peter N. Kazembe, Thokozani Kalua, Elaine Abrams, Saeed Ahmed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context High rates of burnout have been reported in low and medium income countries and can detrimentally impact healthcare delivery. Understanding factors associated with burnout amongst health care workers providing HIV care may help develop interventions to prevent/treat burnout. Objectives We sought to understand factors associated with burnout amongst health care workers providing HIV care in Malawi. Methods This was a sub-study of a larger cross-sectional study measuring burnout prevalence amongst a convenience sample of healthcare workers providing HIV care in 89 health facilities in eight districts in Malawi. Burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Anonymously administered surveys included questions about sociodemographics, work characteristics (work load, supervisor support, team interactions), depression, life stressors, assessment of type D personality, and career satisfaction. We performed univariable and multivariable regression analyses to explore associations between variables and burnout. Results We received 535 responses (response rate 99%). Factors associated with higher rates of burnout on multivariable regression analyses included individual level factors: male gender (OR 1.75 [CI 1.17, 2.63]; p = 0.007), marital status (widowed or divorced) (OR 3.24 [CI 1.32, 7.98]; p = 0.011), depression (OR 3.32 [CI 1.21, 9.10]; p = 0.020), type D personality type (OR 2.77 [CI 1.50, 5.12]; p = 0.001) as well as work related factors: working at a health center vs. a rural hospital (OR 2.02 [CI 1.19, 3.40]; p = 0.009); lack of a very supportive supervisor (OR 2.38 [CI 1.32, 4.29]; p = 0.004), dissatisfaction with work/team interaction (OR 1.76 [CI 1.17, 2.66]; p = 0.007), and career dissatisfaction (OR 0.76 [CI 0.60, 0.96]; p = 0.020). Conclusion This study identified several individual level vulnerabilities as well as work related modifiable factors. Improving the supervisory capacity of health facility managers and creating conditions for improved team dynamics may help reduce burnout amongst healthcare workers proving HIV care in Malawi.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0222638
JournalPloS one
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Malawi
health care workers
Supervisory personnel
Health
HIV
supervisors
Delivery of Health Care
Health care
Type D Personality
Health Facilities
rural hospitals
marital status
Regression Analysis
Depression
Managers
Rural Hospitals
Widowhood
cross-sectional studies
Divorce
health services

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Kim, M. H., Mazenga, A. C., Yu, X., Simon, K., Nyasulu, P., Kazembe, P. N., ... Ahmed, S. (2019). Factors associated with burnout amongst healthcare workers providing HIV care in Malawi. PloS one, 14(9), [e0222638]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0222638

Factors associated with burnout amongst healthcare workers providing HIV care in Malawi. / Kim, Maria H.; Mazenga, Alick C.; Yu, Xiaoying; Simon, Katie; Nyasulu, Phoebe; Kazembe, Peter N.; Kalua, Thokozani; Abrams, Elaine; Ahmed, Saeed.

In: PloS one, Vol. 14, No. 9, e0222638, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, MH, Mazenga, AC, Yu, X, Simon, K, Nyasulu, P, Kazembe, PN, Kalua, T, Abrams, E & Ahmed, S 2019, 'Factors associated with burnout amongst healthcare workers providing HIV care in Malawi', PloS one, vol. 14, no. 9, e0222638. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0222638
Kim, Maria H. ; Mazenga, Alick C. ; Yu, Xiaoying ; Simon, Katie ; Nyasulu, Phoebe ; Kazembe, Peter N. ; Kalua, Thokozani ; Abrams, Elaine ; Ahmed, Saeed. / Factors associated with burnout amongst healthcare workers providing HIV care in Malawi. In: PloS one. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 9.
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abstract = "Context High rates of burnout have been reported in low and medium income countries and can detrimentally impact healthcare delivery. Understanding factors associated with burnout amongst health care workers providing HIV care may help develop interventions to prevent/treat burnout. Objectives We sought to understand factors associated with burnout amongst health care workers providing HIV care in Malawi. Methods This was a sub-study of a larger cross-sectional study measuring burnout prevalence amongst a convenience sample of healthcare workers providing HIV care in 89 health facilities in eight districts in Malawi. Burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Anonymously administered surveys included questions about sociodemographics, work characteristics (work load, supervisor support, team interactions), depression, life stressors, assessment of type D personality, and career satisfaction. We performed univariable and multivariable regression analyses to explore associations between variables and burnout. Results We received 535 responses (response rate 99{\%}). Factors associated with higher rates of burnout on multivariable regression analyses included individual level factors: male gender (OR 1.75 [CI 1.17, 2.63]; p = 0.007), marital status (widowed or divorced) (OR 3.24 [CI 1.32, 7.98]; p = 0.011), depression (OR 3.32 [CI 1.21, 9.10]; p = 0.020), type D personality type (OR 2.77 [CI 1.50, 5.12]; p = 0.001) as well as work related factors: working at a health center vs. a rural hospital (OR 2.02 [CI 1.19, 3.40]; p = 0.009); lack of a very supportive supervisor (OR 2.38 [CI 1.32, 4.29]; p = 0.004), dissatisfaction with work/team interaction (OR 1.76 [CI 1.17, 2.66]; p = 0.007), and career dissatisfaction (OR 0.76 [CI 0.60, 0.96]; p = 0.020). Conclusion This study identified several individual level vulnerabilities as well as work related modifiable factors. Improving the supervisory capacity of health facility managers and creating conditions for improved team dynamics may help reduce burnout amongst healthcare workers proving HIV care in Malawi.",
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AU - Kazembe, Peter N.

AU - Kalua, Thokozani

AU - Abrams, Elaine

AU - Ahmed, Saeed

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N2 - Context High rates of burnout have been reported in low and medium income countries and can detrimentally impact healthcare delivery. Understanding factors associated with burnout amongst health care workers providing HIV care may help develop interventions to prevent/treat burnout. Objectives We sought to understand factors associated with burnout amongst health care workers providing HIV care in Malawi. Methods This was a sub-study of a larger cross-sectional study measuring burnout prevalence amongst a convenience sample of healthcare workers providing HIV care in 89 health facilities in eight districts in Malawi. Burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Anonymously administered surveys included questions about sociodemographics, work characteristics (work load, supervisor support, team interactions), depression, life stressors, assessment of type D personality, and career satisfaction. We performed univariable and multivariable regression analyses to explore associations between variables and burnout. Results We received 535 responses (response rate 99%). Factors associated with higher rates of burnout on multivariable regression analyses included individual level factors: male gender (OR 1.75 [CI 1.17, 2.63]; p = 0.007), marital status (widowed or divorced) (OR 3.24 [CI 1.32, 7.98]; p = 0.011), depression (OR 3.32 [CI 1.21, 9.10]; p = 0.020), type D personality type (OR 2.77 [CI 1.50, 5.12]; p = 0.001) as well as work related factors: working at a health center vs. a rural hospital (OR 2.02 [CI 1.19, 3.40]; p = 0.009); lack of a very supportive supervisor (OR 2.38 [CI 1.32, 4.29]; p = 0.004), dissatisfaction with work/team interaction (OR 1.76 [CI 1.17, 2.66]; p = 0.007), and career dissatisfaction (OR 0.76 [CI 0.60, 0.96]; p = 0.020). Conclusion This study identified several individual level vulnerabilities as well as work related modifiable factors. Improving the supervisory capacity of health facility managers and creating conditions for improved team dynamics may help reduce burnout amongst healthcare workers proving HIV care in Malawi.

AB - Context High rates of burnout have been reported in low and medium income countries and can detrimentally impact healthcare delivery. Understanding factors associated with burnout amongst health care workers providing HIV care may help develop interventions to prevent/treat burnout. Objectives We sought to understand factors associated with burnout amongst health care workers providing HIV care in Malawi. Methods This was a sub-study of a larger cross-sectional study measuring burnout prevalence amongst a convenience sample of healthcare workers providing HIV care in 89 health facilities in eight districts in Malawi. Burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Anonymously administered surveys included questions about sociodemographics, work characteristics (work load, supervisor support, team interactions), depression, life stressors, assessment of type D personality, and career satisfaction. We performed univariable and multivariable regression analyses to explore associations between variables and burnout. Results We received 535 responses (response rate 99%). Factors associated with higher rates of burnout on multivariable regression analyses included individual level factors: male gender (OR 1.75 [CI 1.17, 2.63]; p = 0.007), marital status (widowed or divorced) (OR 3.24 [CI 1.32, 7.98]; p = 0.011), depression (OR 3.32 [CI 1.21, 9.10]; p = 0.020), type D personality type (OR 2.77 [CI 1.50, 5.12]; p = 0.001) as well as work related factors: working at a health center vs. a rural hospital (OR 2.02 [CI 1.19, 3.40]; p = 0.009); lack of a very supportive supervisor (OR 2.38 [CI 1.32, 4.29]; p = 0.004), dissatisfaction with work/team interaction (OR 1.76 [CI 1.17, 2.66]; p = 0.007), and career dissatisfaction (OR 0.76 [CI 0.60, 0.96]; p = 0.020). Conclusion This study identified several individual level vulnerabilities as well as work related modifiable factors. Improving the supervisory capacity of health facility managers and creating conditions for improved team dynamics may help reduce burnout amongst healthcare workers proving HIV care in Malawi.

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