Factors associated with racial/ethnic differences in colorectal cancer screening

Navkiran K. Shokar, Carol A. Carlson, Susan Weller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Racial/ethnic differences in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates are thought to account, in part, for the racial/ethnic differences in CRC disease burden. The purpose of this study was to examine which factors mediate racial/ethnic differences in CRC screening. Methods: Five hundred sixty participants attending a primary care clinic, aged 50 to 80 years, and of African-American, Hispanic, or non-Hispanic white race/ethnicity were interviewed. The goal was to assess the contribution of sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, beliefs about CRC, and the health care experience with their primary care doctor to racial/ethnic differences in CRC screening. The outcome variable was self-reported screening. All analyses were weighted; bivariate testing and multivariate logistic regression was conducted. Results: The response rate was 55.7%, with no sociodemographic differences noted between respondents and nonrespondents. Respondents were African-American (n = 194), Hispanic (n = 162), and non-Hispanic white (n = 204); 64.5% were aged 50 to 64 years; 63.1% were women; 96.9% were insured; and over half reported a total annual income of less than $25,000. Overall 62.5% were current with CRC screening: 67.5% of non-Hispanic whites, 54.3% of African-Americans, and 48.6% of Hispanics (P < .001). A doctor's recommendation (odds ratio, 3.86); awareness of screening (odds ratio, 3.32); older age (odds ratio, 2.88); greater education (odds ratio, 2.02); and perceived susceptibility (odds ratio, 1.74) contributed to racial/ethnic differences in CRC screening. Conclusions: Interventions to address CRC screening disparities among racial/ethnic groups should focus on the health care setting and patient education about CRC screening; differences in attitudes and beliefs seem to be less important.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)414-426
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

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Early Detection of Cancer
Colorectal Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Primary Health Care
Delivery of Health Care
Patient Education
Ethnic Groups
Logistic Models
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Family Practice

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Factors associated with racial/ethnic differences in colorectal cancer screening. / Shokar, Navkiran K.; Carlson, Carol A.; Weller, Susan.

In: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 5, 09.2008, p. 414-426.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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