Family involvement in inpatient care in Taiwan

Huey-Ming Tzeng, Chang Yi Yin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This descriptive, cross-sectional survey study illustrates the roles for and motives of being a family visitor to accompany a hospitalized loved one during hospitalization in a Taiwanese hospital. Family visitors were approached by research assistants on a random basis in acute inpatient units. Among the 1,034 participants, 91% were relatives. About 80.0% of them were present to attend to the patient's physical care, 61.0% to offer psychological support, and 63.5% to express their desire to learn more about the patient's medical condition and illness in time. Their primary motives included fulfilling one of their responsibilities, coming to help voluntarily, showing filial piety for their parent, and being afraid that the patient could not obtain appropriate care. The family involvement culture in Taiwan may have placed pressure on family members to be present at the bedside and contributed to families' psychological and financial burden.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-311
Number of pages15
JournalClinical Nursing Research
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Taiwan
Inpatients
Cross-Sectional Studies
Psychology
Patient Care
Hospitalization
Pressure
Research

Keywords

  • Family
  • Hospitals
  • Inpatients
  • Patient care
  • Safety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Family involvement in inpatient care in Taiwan. / Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang Yi.

In: Clinical Nursing Research, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.11.2008, p. 297-311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tzeng, Huey-Ming ; Yin, Chang Yi. / Family involvement in inpatient care in Taiwan. In: Clinical Nursing Research. 2008 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 297-311.
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