Feasibility of Using Active Video Gaming as a Means for Increasing Energy Expenditure in Three Nonambulatory Young Adults With Disabilities

Jennifer L. Rowland, James H. Rimmer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To examine the feasibility of adapting active video games (AVGs) for nonambulatory wheelchair users at functionally diverse levels and to examine these AVGs as a method for increasing energy expenditure (EE) for 3 young adults with severe (SEV), moderate (MOD), and no upper extremity limitation (NL). Design: Case study. Setting: Residential special education school for youth and young adults with physical disabilities. Participants: Two young adults with spastic cerebral palsy (SEV, MOD) and one young adult with spina bifida (NL). All participants were nonambulatory wheelchair users. Methods: Each participant performed Wii bowling and tennis and an adapted upper extremity version of a Dance Dance Revolution (DDR) game pad. Main Outcome Measurements: EE was measured through indirect calorimetry (VO2). Heart rate data were collected with the use of a Polar Heart Rate Monitor. Results: SEV and MOD participants showed a higher percentage increase in EE for the Wii games (SEV, 25.6%; MOD, 30.8%) compared with DDR (SEV, 10.8%; MOD, 29.1%), whereas the participant with NL had a greater EE increase for the DDR (173.5%) compared with Wii (59.5%). Conclusions: AVGs showed clinically significant increases in EE for all 3 participants and can be performed by nonambulatory wheelchair users ranging from those with NL to those with SEV upper extremity limitation with the appropriate adaptations.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)569-573
    Number of pages5
    JournalPM and R
    Volume4
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Aug 2012

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    Energy Metabolism
    Young Adult
    Video Games
    Wheelchairs
    Upper Extremity
    Heart Rate
    Tennis
    Indirect Calorimetry
    Special Education
    Spinal Dysraphism
    Cerebral Palsy

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Rehabilitation
    • Neurology
    • Clinical Neurology
    • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

    Cite this

    Feasibility of Using Active Video Gaming as a Means for Increasing Energy Expenditure in Three Nonambulatory Young Adults With Disabilities. / Rowland, Jennifer L.; Rimmer, James H.

    In: PM and R, Vol. 4, No. 8, 08.2012, p. 569-573.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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