Fetal male gender and the benefits of treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus

Ray O. Bahado-Singh, Lisa Mele, Mark B. Landon, Susan M. Ramin, Marshall W. Carpenter, Brian Casey, Ronald J. Wapner, Michael W. Varner, Dwight J. Rouse, John M. Thorp, Anthony Sciscione, Patrick Catalano, Margaret Harper, George Saade, Steve N. Caritis, Alan M. Peaceman, Jorge E. Tolosa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: We evaluated whether improvements in pregnancy outcomes after treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus differed in magnitude on the basis of fetal gender. Study Design: This is a secondary analysis of a masked randomized controlled trial of treatment for mild gestational diabetes mellitus. The results included preeclampsia or gestational hypertension, birthweight, neonatal fat mass, and composite adverse outcomes for both neonate (preterm birth, small for gestational age, or neonatal intensive care unit admission) and mother (labor induction, cesarean delivery, preeclampsia, or gestational hypertension). After stratification according to fetal gender, the interaction of gender with treatment status was estimated for these outcomes. Results: Of the 469 pregnancies with male fetuses, 244 pregnancies were assigned randomly to treatment, and 225 pregnancies were assigned randomly to routine care. Of the 463 pregnancies with female fetuses, 233 pregnancies were assigned randomly to treatment, and 230 pregnancies were assigned randomly to routine care. The interaction of gender with treatment status was significant for fat mass (P =.04) and birthweight percentile (P =.02). Among women who were assigned to the treatment group, male offspring were significantly more likely to have both a lower birthweight percentile (50.7 ± 29.2 vs 62.5 ± 30.2 percentile; P <.0001) and less neonatal fat mass (487 ± 229.6 g vs 416.6 ± 172.8 g; P =.0005,) whereas these differences were not significant among female offspring. There was no interaction between fetal gender and treatment group with regard to other outcomes. Conclusion: The magnitude of the reduction of a newborn's birthweight percentile and neonatal fat mass that were related to the treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus appears greater for male neonates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume206
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

Fingerprint

Gestational Diabetes
Pregnancy
Fats
Pregnancy Induced Hypertension
Therapeutics
Newborn Infant
Pre-Eclampsia
Fetus
Induced Labor
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Premature Birth
Pregnancy Outcome
Gestational Age
Randomized Controlled Trials
Mothers

Keywords

  • gender
  • gestational diabetes mellitus
  • outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Bahado-Singh, R. O., Mele, L., Landon, M. B., Ramin, S. M., Carpenter, M. W., Casey, B., ... Tolosa, J. E. (2012). Fetal male gender and the benefits of treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 206(5). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2012.03.015

Fetal male gender and the benefits of treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus. / Bahado-Singh, Ray O.; Mele, Lisa; Landon, Mark B.; Ramin, Susan M.; Carpenter, Marshall W.; Casey, Brian; Wapner, Ronald J.; Varner, Michael W.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Thorp, John M.; Sciscione, Anthony; Catalano, Patrick; Harper, Margaret; Saade, George; Caritis, Steve N.; Peaceman, Alan M.; Tolosa, Jorge E.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 206, No. 5, 05.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bahado-Singh, RO, Mele, L, Landon, MB, Ramin, SM, Carpenter, MW, Casey, B, Wapner, RJ, Varner, MW, Rouse, DJ, Thorp, JM, Sciscione, A, Catalano, P, Harper, M, Saade, G, Caritis, SN, Peaceman, AM & Tolosa, JE 2012, 'Fetal male gender and the benefits of treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus', American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 206, no. 5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2012.03.015
Bahado-Singh, Ray O. ; Mele, Lisa ; Landon, Mark B. ; Ramin, Susan M. ; Carpenter, Marshall W. ; Casey, Brian ; Wapner, Ronald J. ; Varner, Michael W. ; Rouse, Dwight J. ; Thorp, John M. ; Sciscione, Anthony ; Catalano, Patrick ; Harper, Margaret ; Saade, George ; Caritis, Steve N. ; Peaceman, Alan M. ; Tolosa, Jorge E. / Fetal male gender and the benefits of treatment of mild gestational diabetes mellitus. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2012 ; Vol. 206, No. 5.
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