Filovirus outbreak detection and surveillance

Lessons from bundibugyo

Adam MacNeil, Eileen C. Farnon, Oliver W. Morgan, Philip Gould, Tegan K. Boehmer, David D. Blaney, Petra Wiersma, Jordan W. Tappero, Stuart T. Nichol, Thomas Ksiazek, Pierre E. Rollin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The first outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) due to Bundibugyo ebolavirus occurred in Uganda from August to December 2007. During outbreak response and assessment, we identified 131 EHF cases (44 suspect, 31 probable, and 56 confirmed). Consistent with previous large filovirus outbreaks, a long temporal lag (approximately 3 months) occurred between initial EHF cases and the subsequent identification of Ebola virus and outbreak response, which allowed for prolonged person-to-person transmission of the virus. Although effective control measures for filovirus outbreaks, such as patient isolation and contact tracing, are well established, our observations from the Bundibugyo EHF outbreak demonstrate the need for improved filovirus surveillance, reporting, and diagnostics, in endemic locations in Africa.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume204
Issue numberSUPPL. 3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2011

Fingerprint

Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever
Disease Outbreaks
Ebolavirus
Patient Isolation
Contact Tracing
Uganda
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

MacNeil, A., Farnon, E. C., Morgan, O. W., Gould, P., Boehmer, T. K., Blaney, D. D., ... Rollin, P. E. (2011). Filovirus outbreak detection and surveillance: Lessons from bundibugyo. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 204(SUPPL. 3). https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jir294

Filovirus outbreak detection and surveillance : Lessons from bundibugyo. / MacNeil, Adam; Farnon, Eileen C.; Morgan, Oliver W.; Gould, Philip; Boehmer, Tegan K.; Blaney, David D.; Wiersma, Petra; Tappero, Jordan W.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Ksiazek, Thomas; Rollin, Pierre E.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 204, No. SUPPL. 3, 01.11.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

MacNeil, A, Farnon, EC, Morgan, OW, Gould, P, Boehmer, TK, Blaney, DD, Wiersma, P, Tappero, JW, Nichol, ST, Ksiazek, T & Rollin, PE 2011, 'Filovirus outbreak detection and surveillance: Lessons from bundibugyo', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 204, no. SUPPL. 3. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jir294
MacNeil A, Farnon EC, Morgan OW, Gould P, Boehmer TK, Blaney DD et al. Filovirus outbreak detection and surveillance: Lessons from bundibugyo. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2011 Nov 1;204(SUPPL. 3). https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jir294
MacNeil, Adam ; Farnon, Eileen C. ; Morgan, Oliver W. ; Gould, Philip ; Boehmer, Tegan K. ; Blaney, David D. ; Wiersma, Petra ; Tappero, Jordan W. ; Nichol, Stuart T. ; Ksiazek, Thomas ; Rollin, Pierre E. / Filovirus outbreak detection and surveillance : Lessons from bundibugyo. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2011 ; Vol. 204, No. SUPPL. 3.
@article{501490a21e0144e2a3b1cbf957f8c798,
title = "Filovirus outbreak detection and surveillance: Lessons from bundibugyo",
abstract = "The first outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) due to Bundibugyo ebolavirus occurred in Uganda from August to December 2007. During outbreak response and assessment, we identified 131 EHF cases (44 suspect, 31 probable, and 56 confirmed). Consistent with previous large filovirus outbreaks, a long temporal lag (approximately 3 months) occurred between initial EHF cases and the subsequent identification of Ebola virus and outbreak response, which allowed for prolonged person-to-person transmission of the virus. Although effective control measures for filovirus outbreaks, such as patient isolation and contact tracing, are well established, our observations from the Bundibugyo EHF outbreak demonstrate the need for improved filovirus surveillance, reporting, and diagnostics, in endemic locations in Africa.",
author = "Adam MacNeil and Farnon, {Eileen C.} and Morgan, {Oliver W.} and Philip Gould and Boehmer, {Tegan K.} and Blaney, {David D.} and Petra Wiersma and Tappero, {Jordan W.} and Nichol, {Stuart T.} and Thomas Ksiazek and Rollin, {Pierre E.}",
year = "2011",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/infdis/jir294",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "204",
journal = "Journal of Infectious Diseases",
issn = "0022-1899",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "SUPPL. 3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Filovirus outbreak detection and surveillance

T2 - Lessons from bundibugyo

AU - MacNeil, Adam

AU - Farnon, Eileen C.

AU - Morgan, Oliver W.

AU - Gould, Philip

AU - Boehmer, Tegan K.

AU - Blaney, David D.

AU - Wiersma, Petra

AU - Tappero, Jordan W.

AU - Nichol, Stuart T.

AU - Ksiazek, Thomas

AU - Rollin, Pierre E.

PY - 2011/11/1

Y1 - 2011/11/1

N2 - The first outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) due to Bundibugyo ebolavirus occurred in Uganda from August to December 2007. During outbreak response and assessment, we identified 131 EHF cases (44 suspect, 31 probable, and 56 confirmed). Consistent with previous large filovirus outbreaks, a long temporal lag (approximately 3 months) occurred between initial EHF cases and the subsequent identification of Ebola virus and outbreak response, which allowed for prolonged person-to-person transmission of the virus. Although effective control measures for filovirus outbreaks, such as patient isolation and contact tracing, are well established, our observations from the Bundibugyo EHF outbreak demonstrate the need for improved filovirus surveillance, reporting, and diagnostics, in endemic locations in Africa.

AB - The first outbreak of Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) due to Bundibugyo ebolavirus occurred in Uganda from August to December 2007. During outbreak response and assessment, we identified 131 EHF cases (44 suspect, 31 probable, and 56 confirmed). Consistent with previous large filovirus outbreaks, a long temporal lag (approximately 3 months) occurred between initial EHF cases and the subsequent identification of Ebola virus and outbreak response, which allowed for prolonged person-to-person transmission of the virus. Although effective control measures for filovirus outbreaks, such as patient isolation and contact tracing, are well established, our observations from the Bundibugyo EHF outbreak demonstrate the need for improved filovirus surveillance, reporting, and diagnostics, in endemic locations in Africa.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80054769196&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80054769196&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/infdis/jir294

DO - 10.1093/infdis/jir294

M3 - Article

VL - 204

JO - Journal of Infectious Diseases

JF - Journal of Infectious Diseases

SN - 0022-1899

IS - SUPPL. 3

ER -