Fluid management for laparoscopic colectomy: A prospective, randomized assessment of goal-directed administration of balanced salt solution or hetastarch coupled with an enhanced recovery program

A. J. Senagore, T. Emery, M. Luchtefeld, D. Kim, N. Dujovny, R. Hoedema

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: No consensus exists regarding the optimal fluid (crystalloid or colloid) or strategy (liberal, restricted, or goal directed) for fluid management after colectomy. Prior assessments have used normal saline. This is the first assessment of standard, goal-directed perioperative fluid management with either lactated Ringer's or hetastarch/lactated Ringer's, with use of esophageal Doppler for guidance, in laparoscopic colectomy with an enhanced recovery protocol. Methods: A double-blinded, prospective, randomized, three-armed study with Institutional Review Board approval was used for patients undergoing laparoscopic segmental colectomy assigned to the standard, goal-directed/lactated Ringer's and goal-directed/hetastarch groups. A standard anesthesia and basal fluid administration protocol was used in addition to the goal-directed strategies guided by esophageal Doppler. Results: Sixty-four patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy (22 standard, 21 goal-directed/ lactated Ringer's, 21 goal-directed/hetastarch) had similar operative times (standard, 2.3 hours; goal-directed/lactated Ringer's, 2.5 hours; goal-directed/hetastarch, 2.3 hours). The lactated Ringer's group received the greatest amount of total and milliliters per kilogram per hour of operative fluid (standard, 2,850/18; goal-directed/lactated Ringer's, 3,800/ 23; and goal-directed/hetastarch, 3,300/17; P≤0.05). The hetastarch group had the longest stay (standard, 64.9 hours; goal-directed/lactated Ringer's, 71.8 hours; goal-directed/ hetastarch, 75.5 hours; P ≤ 0.05). The standard group received the greatest amount of fluid during hospitalization (standard, 2.5 ml/kg/h; goal-directed/ lactated Ringer's, 1.9 ml/kg/h; goal-directed/ hetastarch, 2.1 ml/kg/h; P ≤ 0.05). There was one instance of operative mortality in the goal-directed/hetastarch group. Conclusions: Goal-directed fluid management with a colloid/balanced salt solution offers no advantage and is more costly. However, goal-directed, individualized intraoperative fluid management with crystalloid should be evaluated further as a component of enhanced recovery protocols following colectomy because of reduced overall fluid administration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1935-1940
Number of pages6
JournalDiseases of the Colon and Rectum
Volume52
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives
Colectomy
Salts
Colloids
Ringer's lactate
Research Ethics Committees
Operative Time
Hospitalization
Anesthesia

Keywords

  • Colloid
  • Colorectal surgery
  • Crystalloid
  • Goaldirected fluid management
  • Outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Fluid management for laparoscopic colectomy : A prospective, randomized assessment of goal-directed administration of balanced salt solution or hetastarch coupled with an enhanced recovery program. / Senagore, A. J.; Emery, T.; Luchtefeld, M.; Kim, D.; Dujovny, N.; Hoedema, R.

In: Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, Vol. 52, No. 12, 12.2009, p. 1935-1940.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Introduction: No consensus exists regarding the optimal fluid (crystalloid or colloid) or strategy (liberal, restricted, or goal directed) for fluid management after colectomy. Prior assessments have used normal saline. This is the first assessment of standard, goal-directed perioperative fluid management with either lactated Ringer's or hetastarch/lactated Ringer's, with use of esophageal Doppler for guidance, in laparoscopic colectomy with an enhanced recovery protocol. Methods: A double-blinded, prospective, randomized, three-armed study with Institutional Review Board approval was used for patients undergoing laparoscopic segmental colectomy assigned to the standard, goal-directed/lactated Ringer's and goal-directed/hetastarch groups. A standard anesthesia and basal fluid administration protocol was used in addition to the goal-directed strategies guided by esophageal Doppler. Results: Sixty-four patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy (22 standard, 21 goal-directed/ lactated Ringer's, 21 goal-directed/hetastarch) had similar operative times (standard, 2.3 hours; goal-directed/lactated Ringer's, 2.5 hours; goal-directed/hetastarch, 2.3 hours). The lactated Ringer's group received the greatest amount of total and milliliters per kilogram per hour of operative fluid (standard, 2,850/18; goal-directed/lactated Ringer's, 3,800/ 23; and goal-directed/hetastarch, 3,300/17; P≤0.05). The hetastarch group had the longest stay (standard, 64.9 hours; goal-directed/lactated Ringer's, 71.8 hours; goal-directed/ hetastarch, 75.5 hours; P ≤ 0.05). The standard group received the greatest amount of fluid during hospitalization (standard, 2.5 ml/kg/h; goal-directed/ lactated Ringer's, 1.9 ml/kg/h; goal-directed/ hetastarch, 2.1 ml/kg/h; P ≤ 0.05). There was one instance of operative mortality in the goal-directed/hetastarch group. Conclusions: Goal-directed fluid management with a colloid/balanced salt solution offers no advantage and is more costly. However, goal-directed, individualized intraoperative fluid management with crystalloid should be evaluated further as a component of enhanced recovery protocols following colectomy because of reduced overall fluid administration.",
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T2 - A prospective, randomized assessment of goal-directed administration of balanced salt solution or hetastarch coupled with an enhanced recovery program

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AU - Luchtefeld, M.

AU - Kim, D.

AU - Dujovny, N.

AU - Hoedema, R.

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N2 - Introduction: No consensus exists regarding the optimal fluid (crystalloid or colloid) or strategy (liberal, restricted, or goal directed) for fluid management after colectomy. Prior assessments have used normal saline. This is the first assessment of standard, goal-directed perioperative fluid management with either lactated Ringer's or hetastarch/lactated Ringer's, with use of esophageal Doppler for guidance, in laparoscopic colectomy with an enhanced recovery protocol. Methods: A double-blinded, prospective, randomized, three-armed study with Institutional Review Board approval was used for patients undergoing laparoscopic segmental colectomy assigned to the standard, goal-directed/lactated Ringer's and goal-directed/hetastarch groups. A standard anesthesia and basal fluid administration protocol was used in addition to the goal-directed strategies guided by esophageal Doppler. Results: Sixty-four patients undergoing laparoscopic colectomy (22 standard, 21 goal-directed/ lactated Ringer's, 21 goal-directed/hetastarch) had similar operative times (standard, 2.3 hours; goal-directed/lactated Ringer's, 2.5 hours; goal-directed/hetastarch, 2.3 hours). The lactated Ringer's group received the greatest amount of total and milliliters per kilogram per hour of operative fluid (standard, 2,850/18; goal-directed/lactated Ringer's, 3,800/ 23; and goal-directed/hetastarch, 3,300/17; P≤0.05). The hetastarch group had the longest stay (standard, 64.9 hours; goal-directed/lactated Ringer's, 71.8 hours; goal-directed/ hetastarch, 75.5 hours; P ≤ 0.05). The standard group received the greatest amount of fluid during hospitalization (standard, 2.5 ml/kg/h; goal-directed/ lactated Ringer's, 1.9 ml/kg/h; goal-directed/ hetastarch, 2.1 ml/kg/h; P ≤ 0.05). There was one instance of operative mortality in the goal-directed/hetastarch group. Conclusions: Goal-directed fluid management with a colloid/balanced salt solution offers no advantage and is more costly. However, goal-directed, individualized intraoperative fluid management with crystalloid should be evaluated further as a component of enhanced recovery protocols following colectomy because of reduced overall fluid administration.

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KW - Colorectal surgery

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