Fluoroscopy-assisted dual-catheter thromboembolectomy: A new technique useful in patients with embolization to arteries of disproportionate diameters

T. L. Proffitt, R. E. Noll, R. J. Wilkerson, W. Todd Bohannon, Michael Silva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Distal embolization is a complication of aortoiliac aneurysm repair. Fluoroscopy-assisted catheter thromboembolectomy is useful in removing popliteal and tibial emboli from the femoral approach. Concomitant presence of aortoiliac and popliteal aneurysms, a known association, may present a difficult challenge to embolus extraction. Currently available embolectomy catheters large enough for thrombus extraction from a popliteal aneurysm are too large for safe tibial artery cannulation, and tibial balloon catheters cannot be enlarged sufficiently to transfer the thrombus through the aneurysmal popliteal segment. We treated a patient who embolized to his popliteal aneurysm and distal tibial circulation following aortoiliac aneurysm repair. A fluoroscopy-assisted dual-catheter technique was used to extract the thrombus through the femoral approach, eliminating the need for direct popliteal or tibial exploration. This technique uses two balloon catheters of graduated size, maneuvered concurrently under fluoroscopic guidance into the tibial and popliteal circulation. The smaller tibial catheter is inflated, and thrombus is withdrawn into the popliteal segment. The larger popliteal balloon catheter is then inflated distal to the smaller catheter, and both catheters are withdrawn simultaneously to deliver the clot through the femoral arteriotomy. This technique can be useful for successful balloon catheter extraction of thrombus via remote access, in an arterial system with variable diameter, eliminating the need for direct popliteal or tibial exploration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)899-901
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Fluoroscopy
Catheters
Arteries
Aneurysm
Thrombosis
Thigh
Embolism
Tibial Arteries
Embolectomy
Catheterization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

Fluoroscopy-assisted dual-catheter thromboembolectomy : A new technique useful in patients with embolization to arteries of disproportionate diameters. / Proffitt, T. L.; Noll, R. E.; Wilkerson, R. J.; Bohannon, W. Todd; Silva, Michael.

In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.04.2003, p. 899-901.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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