Force-dependent cell signaling in stem cell differentiation

Evelyn K F Yim, Michael Sheetz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Stem cells interact with biochemical and biophysical signals in their extracellular environment. The biophysical signals are transduced to the stem cells either through the underlying extracellular matrix or externally applied forces. Increasing evidence has shown that these biophysical cues such as substrate stiffness and topography can direct stem cell differentiation and determine the cell fate. The mechanism of the biophysically induced differentiation is not understood; however, several key signaling components have been demonstrated to be involved in the force-mediated differentiation. This review will focus on focal adhesions, cytoskeletal contractility, Rho GTPase signaling and nuclear regulation in connection with biophysically induced differentiation. We will briefly introduce the important components of the mechanotransduction machinery, and the recent developments in the study of force-dependent stem cell differentiation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number41
JournalStem Cell Research and Therapy
Volume3
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 6 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cell signaling
Stem cells
Cell Differentiation
Stem Cells
rho GTP-Binding Proteins
Focal Adhesions
Topography
Machinery
Cues
Extracellular Matrix
Adhesion
Stiffness
Substrates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology (miscellaneous)
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell Biology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Force-dependent cell signaling in stem cell differentiation. / Yim, Evelyn K F; Sheetz, Michael.

In: Stem Cell Research and Therapy, Vol. 3, No. 5, 41, 06.11.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{9635bae6e555448d86c3afe574fecb2f,
title = "Force-dependent cell signaling in stem cell differentiation",
abstract = "Stem cells interact with biochemical and biophysical signals in their extracellular environment. The biophysical signals are transduced to the stem cells either through the underlying extracellular matrix or externally applied forces. Increasing evidence has shown that these biophysical cues such as substrate stiffness and topography can direct stem cell differentiation and determine the cell fate. The mechanism of the biophysically induced differentiation is not understood; however, several key signaling components have been demonstrated to be involved in the force-mediated differentiation. This review will focus on focal adhesions, cytoskeletal contractility, Rho GTPase signaling and nuclear regulation in connection with biophysically induced differentiation. We will briefly introduce the important components of the mechanotransduction machinery, and the recent developments in the study of force-dependent stem cell differentiation.",
author = "Yim, {Evelyn K F} and Michael Sheetz",
year = "2012",
month = "11",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1186/scrt132",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
journal = "Stem Cell Research and Therapy",
issn = "1757-6512",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Force-dependent cell signaling in stem cell differentiation

AU - Yim, Evelyn K F

AU - Sheetz, Michael

PY - 2012/11/6

Y1 - 2012/11/6

N2 - Stem cells interact with biochemical and biophysical signals in their extracellular environment. The biophysical signals are transduced to the stem cells either through the underlying extracellular matrix or externally applied forces. Increasing evidence has shown that these biophysical cues such as substrate stiffness and topography can direct stem cell differentiation and determine the cell fate. The mechanism of the biophysically induced differentiation is not understood; however, several key signaling components have been demonstrated to be involved in the force-mediated differentiation. This review will focus on focal adhesions, cytoskeletal contractility, Rho GTPase signaling and nuclear regulation in connection with biophysically induced differentiation. We will briefly introduce the important components of the mechanotransduction machinery, and the recent developments in the study of force-dependent stem cell differentiation.

AB - Stem cells interact with biochemical and biophysical signals in their extracellular environment. The biophysical signals are transduced to the stem cells either through the underlying extracellular matrix or externally applied forces. Increasing evidence has shown that these biophysical cues such as substrate stiffness and topography can direct stem cell differentiation and determine the cell fate. The mechanism of the biophysically induced differentiation is not understood; however, several key signaling components have been demonstrated to be involved in the force-mediated differentiation. This review will focus on focal adhesions, cytoskeletal contractility, Rho GTPase signaling and nuclear regulation in connection with biophysically induced differentiation. We will briefly introduce the important components of the mechanotransduction machinery, and the recent developments in the study of force-dependent stem cell differentiation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84868237648&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84868237648&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/scrt132

DO - 10.1186/scrt132

M3 - Review article

C2 - 23114057

AN - SCOPUS:84868237648

VL - 3

JO - Stem Cell Research and Therapy

JF - Stem Cell Research and Therapy

SN - 1757-6512

IS - 5

M1 - 41

ER -