Frequent inter-species transmission and geographic subdivision in avian influenza viruses from wild birds

Rubing Chen, Edward C. Holmes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Revealing the factors that shape the genetic structure of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in wild bird populations is essential to understanding their evolution. However, the relationship between epidemiological dynamics and patterns of genetic diversity in AIV is not well understood, especially at the continental scale. To address this question, we undertook a phylogeographic analysis of complete genome sequences of AIV sampled from wild birds in North America. In particular, we asked whether host species, geographic location or sampling time played the major role in shaping patterns of viral genetic diversity. Strikingly, our analysis revealed no strong species effect, yet a significant viral clustering by time and place of sampling, as well as the circulation of multiple viral lineages in single locations. These results suggest that AIVs can readily infect many of the bird species that share breeding/feeding areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)156-161
Number of pages6
JournalVirology
Volume383
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 5 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Influenza in Birds
Orthomyxoviridae
Birds
Geographic Locations
Genetic Structures
North America
Breeding
Cluster Analysis
Genome
Population

Keywords

  • Avian influenza virus
  • Epidemiology
  • Migration
  • Phylogeny
  • Population structure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

Cite this

Frequent inter-species transmission and geographic subdivision in avian influenza viruses from wild birds. / Chen, Rubing; Holmes, Edward C.

In: Virology, Vol. 383, No. 1, 05.01.2009, p. 156-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Rubing ; Holmes, Edward C. / Frequent inter-species transmission and geographic subdivision in avian influenza viruses from wild birds. In: Virology. 2009 ; Vol. 383, No. 1. pp. 156-161.
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