From sufficient to efficient usage: An analysis of strategic knowledge

Suresh Bhavnani, Bonnie E. John

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Can good design guarantee the efficient use of computer tools? Can experience guarantee it? We raise these questions to explore why empirical studies of real-world usage show even experienced users under-utilizing the capabilities of computer applications. By analyzing the use of everyday devices and computer applications, as well as reviewing empirical studies, we conclude that neither good design nor experience may be able to guarantee efficient usage. Efficient use requires task decomposition strategies that exploit capabilities offered by computer applications such as the ability to aggregate objects, and to manipulate the aggregates with powerful operators. To understand the effects that strategies can have on performance, we present results from a GOMS analysis of a CAD task. Furthermore, we identify some key aggregation strategies that appear to generalize across applications. Such strategies may provide a framework to enable users to move from a sufficient to a more efficient use of computer tools.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
EditorsS. Pemberton
Place of PublicationNew York, NY, United States
PublisherACM
Pages91-98
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1997 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI - Atlanta, GA, USA
Duration: Mar 22 1997Mar 27 1997

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1997 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI
CityAtlanta, GA, USA
Period3/22/973/27/97

    Fingerprint

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Bhavnani, S., & John, B. E. (1997). From sufficient to efficient usage: An analysis of strategic knowledge. In S. Pemberton (Ed.), Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings (pp. 91-98). ACM.