Functional Outcomes of the Ream-and-Run Shoulder Arthroplasty: A Concise Follow-up of a Previous Report

Jeremy Somerson, Frederick A. Matsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We previously reported the results at an average of 4.5 years after treatment of 176 patients with the ream-and-run arthroplasty. In the present study, we present the patient self-reported functional outcomes and clinical implant survival of the original cohort at a mean of 10 years (range, 5 to 16 years). Twenty-eight (16%) of the 176 patients had a subsequent procedure, 11 (6%) died, and 30 (17%) had <5 years of follow-up. The Simple Shoulder Test (SST) score at the time of the latest follow-up was a median of 11 points (interquartile range, 9 to 12 points) and a mean (and standard deviation) of 10 ± 2.6 points, out of a possible 12 points. The present study demonstrates that the improvement in function and comfort derived from the ream-and-run procedure can be sustained at the time of mid-term follow-up.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1999-2003
Number of pages5
JournalThe Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
Volume99
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 6 2017

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Arthroplasty
Survival
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Functional Outcomes of the Ream-and-Run Shoulder Arthroplasty : A Concise Follow-up of a Previous Report. / Somerson, Jeremy; Matsen, Frederick A.

In: The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume, Vol. 99, No. 23, 06.12.2017, p. 1999-2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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