Functional status and perceived control influence quality of life in female heart transplant recipients

Lorraine Evangelista, Debra Moser, Kathleen Dracup, Lynn Doering, Jon Kobashigawa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The purpose of this study was 2-fold: (1) to describe and compare the quality of life (QOL) and psychologic well-being of 2 groups of women matched for age and functional status (6-minute walk distance), including those who had received a heart transplant and those who were candidates on a transplant waiting list; and (2) to identify correlates of QOL in female heart transplant recipients. Methods Data were collected from 50 female recipients (mean age 54.7 ± 13.0 years) and 50 female candidates (mean age 56.8 ± 12.2 years) from a major heart transplant facility using the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Control Attitude Scale. Results The overall QOL scores were 28.0 ± 26.4 and 56.3 ± 26.1 for recipients and candidates, respectively (p < 0.01), with lower scores denoting higher QOL. The mean physical health (11.3 ± 11.2 vs 19.9 ± 12.1, p < 0.01) and emotional health (7.5 ± 8.2 vs 12.8 ± 7.8, p < 0.001) scores were also lower (reflecting higher physical and emotional health) for recipients as compared with candidates. Likewise, recipients reported significantly (p < 0.001) lower depressive moods (23.2 ± 8.2 vs 45.8 ± 16.3) and higher perceived control (10.9 ± 4.3 vs 8.6 ± 1.9) compared with candidates. Functional status, depression and perceived control were significant correlates of QOL among female recipients and accounted for 49% variance in overall QOL. Conclusions Although overall QOL of was better among female heart transplant recipients than candidates, both groups of women reported poor QOL. Clinicians need to identify potential resources and interventions to improve QOL both before and after heart transplant surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)360-367
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Quality of Life
Transplants
Health
Depression
Transplant Recipients
Waiting Lists
Thoracic Surgery
Research Design
Heart Failure
Equipment and Supplies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Functional status and perceived control influence quality of life in female heart transplant recipients. / Evangelista, Lorraine; Moser, Debra; Dracup, Kathleen; Doering, Lynn; Kobashigawa, Jon.

In: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation, Vol. 23, No. 3, 01.03.2004, p. 360-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Evangelista, Lorraine ; Moser, Debra ; Dracup, Kathleen ; Doering, Lynn ; Kobashigawa, Jon. / Functional status and perceived control influence quality of life in female heart transplant recipients. In: Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation. 2004 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 360-367.
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