Further characterization of a broad-spectrum antiviral substance in human serum

I. P. Singh, D. H. Coppenhaver, Ashok Chopra, S. Baron

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A broadly active antiviral glycoprotein (UTIβ) occurs naturally in human sera at an average antiviral titer of 50U/ml. This inhibitor is active against all virus families tested to date, including representative poxviruses, herpesviruses, enteroviruses, paramyxoviruses, alphaviruses, flaviviruses, bunyaviruses, and rhabdoviruses. It is a glycoprotein of approximately 60,000±10,000Da, which is stable at pH 2 to 10 and at 80°C for up to 10 min. Mild oxidation with NaIO4 and treatment with glycosidases inactivates the material. Proteolytic degradation of the inhibitor molecule releases small active components of <1000Da, which retain antiviral activity. This activity of the small components has increased heat stability (120°C for 15 min) and is inactivated by glycosidases. The antiviral activity thus appears to reside mainly in the oligosaccharide moiety of the glycoprotein. The inhibitor does not neutralize virions, but prevents attachment of most viruses to cells. These properties occur also in highly purified preparations. These findings indicate that human serum contains significant concentrations of a broadly active antiviral glycoprotein, which is distinct from interferon and other antiviral substances naturally found in human body fluids and tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)293-303
Number of pages11
JournalViral Immunology
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

Antiviral Agents
Glycoproteins
Serum
Glycoside Hydrolases
Orthobunyavirus
Rhabdoviridae
Alphavirus
Poxviridae
Virus Attachment
Flavivirus
Enterovirus
Herpesviridae
Body Fluids
Oligosaccharides
Human Body
Virion
Interferons
Hot Temperature
Viruses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Molecular Medicine
  • Virology

Cite this

Further characterization of a broad-spectrum antiviral substance in human serum. / Singh, I. P.; Coppenhaver, D. H.; Chopra, Ashok; Baron, S.

In: Viral Immunology, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.01.1992, p. 293-303.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Singh, I. P. ; Coppenhaver, D. H. ; Chopra, Ashok ; Baron, S. / Further characterization of a broad-spectrum antiviral substance in human serum. In: Viral Immunology. 1992 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 293-303.
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