Gag rules and trade secrets in managed care contracts: Ethical and legal concerns

Howard Brody, Vence L. Bonham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gag rules - clauses in managed care contracts that prevent physicians from disclosing information that the plan may find disparaging, but that could relate directly to the patient's health - have recently been the subject of ethical condemnation and legislative prohibition. Another serious problem in managed care contracts, trade secrets, or guidelines and quality assurance mechanisms that are imposed on physicians while their origins are shrouded in proprietary secrecy, have by contrast received little attention. Responses to these ethical challenges to the physician's integrity must involve individual physicians, managed care organizations, professional organizations, and public policymakers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2037-2043
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume157
Issue number18
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Managed Care Programs
Contracts
Physicians
Confidentiality
Organizations
Guidelines
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Gag rules and trade secrets in managed care contracts : Ethical and legal concerns. / Brody, Howard; Bonham, Vence L.

In: Archives of Internal Medicine, Vol. 157, No. 18, 1997, p. 2037-2043.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brody, Howard ; Bonham, Vence L. / Gag rules and trade secrets in managed care contracts : Ethical and legal concerns. In: Archives of Internal Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 157, No. 18. pp. 2037-2043.
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