Gastroenterology workforce modeling

Gregg S. Meyer, Itzhak Jacoby, Henry Krakauer, Don W. Powell, Jeanette Aurand, Peggy McCardle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. - To examine the current supply and distribution of gastroenterologists and project future supply under various scenarios to provide a paradigm for workforce reform. Design. - An analysis of current practices and distribution of gastroenterologists and a demographic model, using the 1992 gastroenterology workforce as a baseline. Main Outcome Measure. - Comparison of current supply, distribution, and practice profiles with past data and future projections, using analyses of data from the 1993 Area Resource File, 1992 Medicare Part B file, age- and sex-specific death and retirement rates from the Bureau of Health Professions, managed care staffing patterns, the National Survey of Internal Medicine Manpower, and the Bureau of the Census. Results. - Rapid growth in the number of US gastroenterologists has resulted in a gastroenterologist-to-population ratio double that used on average by health maintenance organizations. In addition, the work profile of gastroenterologists is shared significantly by primary care physicians and other specialists, with the exception of a few specific and uncommon procedures. Conclusions. - Empirical evidence suggests that, even in the absence of detailed models to describe the desired supply/need balance for gastroenterology, the US health care system and clinicians may benefit from a reduction in gastroenterology training programs. The Gastroenterology Leadership Council endorsed a goal of 25% to 50% reduction in trainee numbers over 5 years, and recent National Resident Matching Program data indicate that a voluntary downsizing process is in full force. This study illustrates a paradigm for workforce planning that could be useful for other medical specialties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)689-694
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume276
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 4 1996

Fingerprint

Gastroenterology
Medicare Part B
Health Occupations
Health Maintenance Organizations
Retirement
Managed Care Programs
Primary Care Physicians
Censuses
Internal Medicine
Medicine
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Gastroenterologists
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Mortality
Growth
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Meyer, G. S., Jacoby, I., Krakauer, H., Powell, D. W., Aurand, J., & McCardle, P. (1996). Gastroenterology workforce modeling. Journal of the American Medical Association, 276(9), 689-694. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.276.9.689

Gastroenterology workforce modeling. / Meyer, Gregg S.; Jacoby, Itzhak; Krakauer, Henry; Powell, Don W.; Aurand, Jeanette; McCardle, Peggy.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 276, No. 9, 04.09.1996, p. 689-694.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meyer, GS, Jacoby, I, Krakauer, H, Powell, DW, Aurand, J & McCardle, P 1996, 'Gastroenterology workforce modeling', Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 276, no. 9, pp. 689-694. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.276.9.689
Meyer GS, Jacoby I, Krakauer H, Powell DW, Aurand J, McCardle P. Gastroenterology workforce modeling. Journal of the American Medical Association. 1996 Sep 4;276(9):689-694. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.276.9.689
Meyer, Gregg S. ; Jacoby, Itzhak ; Krakauer, Henry ; Powell, Don W. ; Aurand, Jeanette ; McCardle, Peggy. / Gastroenterology workforce modeling. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 1996 ; Vol. 276, No. 9. pp. 689-694.
@article{8a5068a0a7de402a9b1dbed5e3fcabd6,
title = "Gastroenterology workforce modeling",
abstract = "Objective. - To examine the current supply and distribution of gastroenterologists and project future supply under various scenarios to provide a paradigm for workforce reform. Design. - An analysis of current practices and distribution of gastroenterologists and a demographic model, using the 1992 gastroenterology workforce as a baseline. Main Outcome Measure. - Comparison of current supply, distribution, and practice profiles with past data and future projections, using analyses of data from the 1993 Area Resource File, 1992 Medicare Part B file, age- and sex-specific death and retirement rates from the Bureau of Health Professions, managed care staffing patterns, the National Survey of Internal Medicine Manpower, and the Bureau of the Census. Results. - Rapid growth in the number of US gastroenterologists has resulted in a gastroenterologist-to-population ratio double that used on average by health maintenance organizations. In addition, the work profile of gastroenterologists is shared significantly by primary care physicians and other specialists, with the exception of a few specific and uncommon procedures. Conclusions. - Empirical evidence suggests that, even in the absence of detailed models to describe the desired supply/need balance for gastroenterology, the US health care system and clinicians may benefit from a reduction in gastroenterology training programs. The Gastroenterology Leadership Council endorsed a goal of 25{\%} to 50{\%} reduction in trainee numbers over 5 years, and recent National Resident Matching Program data indicate that a voluntary downsizing process is in full force. This study illustrates a paradigm for workforce planning that could be useful for other medical specialties.",
author = "Meyer, {Gregg S.} and Itzhak Jacoby and Henry Krakauer and Powell, {Don W.} and Jeanette Aurand and Peggy McCardle",
year = "1996",
month = "9",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1001/jama.276.9.689",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "276",
pages = "689--694",
journal = "JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association",
issn = "0002-9955",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gastroenterology workforce modeling

AU - Meyer, Gregg S.

AU - Jacoby, Itzhak

AU - Krakauer, Henry

AU - Powell, Don W.

AU - Aurand, Jeanette

AU - McCardle, Peggy

PY - 1996/9/4

Y1 - 1996/9/4

N2 - Objective. - To examine the current supply and distribution of gastroenterologists and project future supply under various scenarios to provide a paradigm for workforce reform. Design. - An analysis of current practices and distribution of gastroenterologists and a demographic model, using the 1992 gastroenterology workforce as a baseline. Main Outcome Measure. - Comparison of current supply, distribution, and practice profiles with past data and future projections, using analyses of data from the 1993 Area Resource File, 1992 Medicare Part B file, age- and sex-specific death and retirement rates from the Bureau of Health Professions, managed care staffing patterns, the National Survey of Internal Medicine Manpower, and the Bureau of the Census. Results. - Rapid growth in the number of US gastroenterologists has resulted in a gastroenterologist-to-population ratio double that used on average by health maintenance organizations. In addition, the work profile of gastroenterologists is shared significantly by primary care physicians and other specialists, with the exception of a few specific and uncommon procedures. Conclusions. - Empirical evidence suggests that, even in the absence of detailed models to describe the desired supply/need balance for gastroenterology, the US health care system and clinicians may benefit from a reduction in gastroenterology training programs. The Gastroenterology Leadership Council endorsed a goal of 25% to 50% reduction in trainee numbers over 5 years, and recent National Resident Matching Program data indicate that a voluntary downsizing process is in full force. This study illustrates a paradigm for workforce planning that could be useful for other medical specialties.

AB - Objective. - To examine the current supply and distribution of gastroenterologists and project future supply under various scenarios to provide a paradigm for workforce reform. Design. - An analysis of current practices and distribution of gastroenterologists and a demographic model, using the 1992 gastroenterology workforce as a baseline. Main Outcome Measure. - Comparison of current supply, distribution, and practice profiles with past data and future projections, using analyses of data from the 1993 Area Resource File, 1992 Medicare Part B file, age- and sex-specific death and retirement rates from the Bureau of Health Professions, managed care staffing patterns, the National Survey of Internal Medicine Manpower, and the Bureau of the Census. Results. - Rapid growth in the number of US gastroenterologists has resulted in a gastroenterologist-to-population ratio double that used on average by health maintenance organizations. In addition, the work profile of gastroenterologists is shared significantly by primary care physicians and other specialists, with the exception of a few specific and uncommon procedures. Conclusions. - Empirical evidence suggests that, even in the absence of detailed models to describe the desired supply/need balance for gastroenterology, the US health care system and clinicians may benefit from a reduction in gastroenterology training programs. The Gastroenterology Leadership Council endorsed a goal of 25% to 50% reduction in trainee numbers over 5 years, and recent National Resident Matching Program data indicate that a voluntary downsizing process is in full force. This study illustrates a paradigm for workforce planning that could be useful for other medical specialties.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029818337&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029818337&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/jama.276.9.689

DO - 10.1001/jama.276.9.689

M3 - Article

VL - 276

SP - 689

EP - 694

JO - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

JF - JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

SN - 0002-9955

IS - 9

ER -