Gender Differences Among Low Income Women in Their Intent to Vaccinate Their Sons and Daughters Against Human Papillomavirus Infection

Abbey B. Berenson, Mahbubur Rahman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study Objective: The HPV vaccine was approved for use in males in 2009. The purpose of our study was to examine current intentions to vaccinate sons and daughters among low income women. Design: A survey was administered to 322 mothers with a son or daughter 9-26 years of age to examine gender differences in intent to vaccinate their children. Setting: Five public reproductive health clinics in southeast Texas, between August, 2010 and May, 2011. Participants: The study population consisted of 322 women with ≥1 child 9-26 years of age. Main Outcome Measures: Knowledge of HPV vaccine, intention to have son or daughter receive the HPV vaccine, and reasons for not vaccinating son or daughter. Results: Women with only a daughter were more willing than those with a son to vaccinate their child (71% vs 44%, P < 0.001). A similar scenario was observed for mothers of both daughters and sons (67% vs 39%, P < 0.001). Mothers of sons as compared to daughters were less likely to consider their child at risk of HPV (27% vs 12%, P = 0.028) while those with daughters were more concerned about side effects (54% vs 33%, P = 0.008). Conclusion: Educational interventions are needed to address the importance to mothers of vaccinating both their sons and daughters against HPV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-220
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012

Keywords

  • Gender differences
  • HPV
  • Human papillomavirus
  • Vaccine
  • Vaccine uptake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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