General surgeons vs. colorectal surgeons: Who should be doing what to whom?

Supriya S. Patel, Anthony J. Senagore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The evolving trend toward subspecialization has dramatically changed the face of general surgery. With an increasing number of general surgery graduates pursuing fellowship training, the question of "Who should be doing what to whom?" has become increasingly relevant. The existing literature on this topic suggests a relationship between specialty training and improved outcomes. Numerous studies have demonstrated the merits of specialization as it relates to all aspects of colorectal care, from the management of benign anorectal disease to complex neoplastic processes. The implications of these findings on the establishment of a surgical workforce that is best equipped to manage the colorectal patient are the focus of this article.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-194
Number of pages4
JournalSeminars in Colon and Rectal Surgery
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Rectal Diseases
Neoplastic Processes
Surgeons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology
  • Surgery

Cite this

General surgeons vs. colorectal surgeons : Who should be doing what to whom? / Patel, Supriya S.; Senagore, Anthony J.

In: Seminars in Colon and Rectal Surgery, Vol. 24, No. 4, 12.2013, p. 191-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patel, Supriya S. ; Senagore, Anthony J. / General surgeons vs. colorectal surgeons : Who should be doing what to whom?. In: Seminars in Colon and Rectal Surgery. 2013 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 191-194.
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