Genetic dysregulation in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis

Regina Rodman, Simukayi Mutasa, Crystal Dupuis, Heidi Spratt, Michael Underbrink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives/Hypothesis Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a devastating disease, caused by infection of the upper aerodigestive tract with human papillomavirus types 6 and 11. There is no cure for RRP, and surgical removal is the mainstay of treatment. The purpose of this project was to compare genes of cell cycle, apoptosis, and inflammatory cytokines in laryngeal papilloma versus normal tissue for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the disease to discover novel therapies. Study Design Basic science research study. Methods Papilloma tissue was obtained from patients requiring surgical debridement. For comparison, normal mucosa was obtained from the excised uvula of patients undergoing uvulopalatopharyngoplasty. Total RNA was extracted from both groups and then probed using customized reverse transcriptase real time polymerase chain reaction gene arrays. Results The custom arrays examine expression of 84 separate genes within the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inflammatory cytokine pathways. Our findings based on 11 papilloma samples run in comparison to normal mucosa shows that the MCL-1 gene of the apoptosis pathway is significantly downregulated. cytokine genes IL1-A, IL-8, IL-18, and IL-31 are also significantly dysregulated. Conclusions Genes of cell cycle and apoptosis are generally upregulated and downregulated, respectively, as expected in papilloma tissue, with MCL-1 achieving significance when compared to normal tissue. The finding of particular interest is that inflammatory cytokine genes were significantly downregulated, including IL1-A, IL-18, and IL-31. This finding may explain why patients infected with the virus are unable to mediate a T-cell immune clearance of their disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume124
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Papilloma
cdc Genes
Cytokines
Interleukin-18
Down-Regulation
Genes
Mucous Membrane
Uvula
Apoptosis
Human papillomavirus 11
Human papillomavirus 6
Debridement
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Interleukin-8
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
RNA
Viruses
T-Lymphocytes
Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • apoptosis
  • cell cycle
  • cytokines respiratory papillomatosis
  • laryngeal papilloma
  • papillomavirus infections
  • recurrent juvenile laryngeal papilloma
  • Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis
  • upper aerodigestive tract infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Genetic dysregulation in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. / Rodman, Regina; Mutasa, Simukayi; Dupuis, Crystal; Spratt, Heidi; Underbrink, Michael.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 124, No. 8, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rodman, Regina ; Mutasa, Simukayi ; Dupuis, Crystal ; Spratt, Heidi ; Underbrink, Michael. / Genetic dysregulation in recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. In: Laryngoscope. 2014 ; Vol. 124, No. 8.
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