Genetic mutations associated with Cigarette smoking in pancreatic cancer

Amanda Blackford, Giovanni Parmigiani, Thomas W. Kensler, Christopher Wolfgang, Siân Jones, Xiaosong Zhang, D. Willams Parsons, Jimmy Cheng Ho Lin, Rebecca J. Leary, James R. Eshleman, Michael Goggins, Elizabeth M. Jaffee, Christine A. Iacobuzio-Donahue, Anirban Maitra, Alison Klein, John L. Cameron, Kelly Olino, Richard Schulick, Jordan Winter, Bert Vogelstein & 3 others Victor E. Velculescu, Kenneth W. Kinzler, Ralph H. Hruban

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Cigarette smoking doubles the risk of pancreatic cancer, and smoking accounts for 20% to 25% of pancreatic cancers. The recent sequencing of the pancreatic cancer genome provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify mutational patterns associated with smoking. We previously sequenced >750 million bp DNA from 23,219 transcripts in 24 adenocarcinomas of the pancreas (discovery screen). In this previous study, the 39 genes that were mutated more than once in the discovery screen were sequenced in an additional 90 adenocarcinomas of the pancreas (validation screen). Here, we compared the somatic mutations in the cancers obtained from individuals who ever smoked cigarettes (« = 64) to the somatic mutations in the cancers obtained from individuals who never smoked cigarettes in = 50). When adjusted for age and gender, analyses of the discovery screen revealed significantly more nonsynonymous mutations in the carcinomas obtained from ever smokers (mean, 53.1 mutations per tumor; SD, 27.9) than in the carcinomas obtained from never smokers (mean, 38.5; SD, 11.1; P = 0.04). The difference between smokers and nonsmokers was not driven by mutations in known driver genes in pancreatic cancer (KMAS, TP53, CDKN2A/pl6, and SMAD4), but instead was predominantly observed in genes mutated at lower frequency. No differences were observed in mutations in carcinomas from the head versus tail of the gland. Pancreatic carcinomas from cigarette smokers harbor more mutations than do carcinomas from never smokers. The types and patterns of these mutations provide insight into the mechanisms by which cigarette smoking causes pancreatic cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3681-3688
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Research
Volume69
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Pancreatic Neoplasms
Smoking
Mutation
Tobacco Products
Carcinoma
Pancreas
Adenocarcinoma
Genes
Neoplasms
Head
Genome
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Blackford, A., Parmigiani, G., Kensler, T. W., Wolfgang, C., Jones, S., Zhang, X., ... Hruban, R. H. (2009). Genetic mutations associated with Cigarette smoking in pancreatic cancer. Cancer Research, 69(8), 3681-3688. https://doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-0015

Genetic mutations associated with Cigarette smoking in pancreatic cancer. / Blackford, Amanda; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Kensler, Thomas W.; Wolfgang, Christopher; Jones, Siân; Zhang, Xiaosong; Parsons, D. Willams; Lin, Jimmy Cheng Ho; Leary, Rebecca J.; Eshleman, James R.; Goggins, Michael; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Maitra, Anirban; Klein, Alison; Cameron, John L.; Olino, Kelly; Schulick, Richard; Winter, Jordan; Vogelstein, Bert; Velculescu, Victor E.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Hruban, Ralph H.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 69, No. 8, 15.04.2009, p. 3681-3688.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Blackford, A, Parmigiani, G, Kensler, TW, Wolfgang, C, Jones, S, Zhang, X, Parsons, DW, Lin, JCH, Leary, RJ, Eshleman, JR, Goggins, M, Jaffee, EM, Iacobuzio-Donahue, CA, Maitra, A, Klein, A, Cameron, JL, Olino, K, Schulick, R, Winter, J, Vogelstein, B, Velculescu, VE, Kinzler, KW & Hruban, RH 2009, 'Genetic mutations associated with Cigarette smoking in pancreatic cancer', Cancer Research, vol. 69, no. 8, pp. 3681-3688. https://doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-0015
Blackford A, Parmigiani G, Kensler TW, Wolfgang C, Jones S, Zhang X et al. Genetic mutations associated with Cigarette smoking in pancreatic cancer. Cancer Research. 2009 Apr 15;69(8):3681-3688. https://doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-0015
Blackford, Amanda ; Parmigiani, Giovanni ; Kensler, Thomas W. ; Wolfgang, Christopher ; Jones, Siân ; Zhang, Xiaosong ; Parsons, D. Willams ; Lin, Jimmy Cheng Ho ; Leary, Rebecca J. ; Eshleman, James R. ; Goggins, Michael ; Jaffee, Elizabeth M. ; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A. ; Maitra, Anirban ; Klein, Alison ; Cameron, John L. ; Olino, Kelly ; Schulick, Richard ; Winter, Jordan ; Vogelstein, Bert ; Velculescu, Victor E. ; Kinzler, Kenneth W. ; Hruban, Ralph H. / Genetic mutations associated with Cigarette smoking in pancreatic cancer. In: Cancer Research. 2009 ; Vol. 69, No. 8. pp. 3681-3688.
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