Gestational exposure to elevated testosterone levels induces hypertension via heightened vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor signaling in rats

Vijayakumar Chinnathambi, Amar S. More, Gary Hankins, Chandra Yallampalli, Kunju Sathishkumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pre-eclampsia is a life-threatening pregnancy disorder whose pathogenesis remains unclear. Plasma testosterone levels are elevated in pregnant women with pre-eclampsia and polycystic ovary syndrome, who often develop gestational hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that increased gestational testosterone levels induce hypertension via heightened angiotensin II signaling. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with vehicle or testosterone propionate from Gestational Day 15 to 19 to induce a 2-fold increase in plasma testosterone levels, similar to levels observed in clinical conditions like pre-eclampsia. A subset of rats in these two groups was given losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist by gavage during the course of testosterone exposure. Blood pressure levels were assessed through a carotid arterial catheter and endothelium-independent vascular reactivity through wire myography. Angiotensin II levels in plasma and angiotensin II type 1 receptor expression in mesenteric arteries were also examined. Blood pressure levels were significantly higher on Gestational Day 20 in testosterone-treated dams than in controls. Treatment with losartan during the course of testosterone exposure significantly attenuated testosterone-induced hypertension. Plasma angiotensin II levels were not significantly different between control and testosterone-treated rats; however, elevated testosterone levels significantly increased angiotensin II type 1 receptor protein levels in the mesenteric arteries. In testosterone-treated rats, mesenteric artery contractile responses to angiotensin II were significantly greater, whereas contractile responses to K+ depolarization and phenylephrine were unaffected. The results demonstrate that elevated testosterone during gestation induces hypertension in pregnant rats via heightened angiotensin II type 1 receptor-mediated signaling, providing a molecular mechanism linking elevated maternal testosterone levels with gestational hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6
JournalBiology of Reproduction
Volume91
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Angiotensin Type 1 Receptor
Blood Vessels
Testosterone
Hypertension
Angiotensin II
Mesenteric Arteries
Pre-Eclampsia
Pregnancy Induced Hypertension
Losartan
Myography
Blood Pressure
Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers
Testosterone Propionate
Pregnancy
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Vascular Endothelium
Phenylephrine
Sprague Dawley Rats
Pregnant Women
Catheters

Keywords

  • AGTR1
  • angiotensin
  • blood pressure
  • losartan
  • mesenteric arteries
  • pre-eclampsia
  • pregnancy
  • testosterone
  • vascular function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Gestational exposure to elevated testosterone levels induces hypertension via heightened vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor signaling in rats. / Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; More, Amar S.; Hankins, Gary; Yallampalli, Chandra; Sathishkumar, Kunju.

In: Biology of Reproduction, Vol. 91, No. 1, 6, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar ; More, Amar S. ; Hankins, Gary ; Yallampalli, Chandra ; Sathishkumar, Kunju. / Gestational exposure to elevated testosterone levels induces hypertension via heightened vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor signaling in rats. In: Biology of Reproduction. 2014 ; Vol. 91, No. 1.
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