Ginkgo biloba

Victor Sierpina, Bernd Wollschlaeger, Mark Blumenthal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ginkgo biloba is commonly used in the treatment of early-stage Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, peripheral claudication, and tinnitus of vascular origin. Multiple trials investigating the efficacy of ginkgo for treating cerebrovascular disease and dementia have been performed, and systematic reviews suggest the herb can improve the symptoms of dementia. Ginkgo is generally well tolerated, but it can increase the risk of bleeding if used in combination with warfarin, antiplatelet agents, and certain other herbal medications. Clinical issues of safety, dosing, use in the perioperative period, and pharmacology are addressed in this review.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)923-926
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume68
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

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Ginkgo biloba
Dementia
Cerebrovascular Disorders
Vascular Dementia
Perioperative Period
Tinnitus
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Warfarin
Alzheimer Disease
Pharmacology
Hemorrhage
Safety
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sierpina, V., Wollschlaeger, B., & Blumenthal, M. (2003). Ginkgo biloba. American Family Physician, 68(5), 923-926.

Ginkgo biloba. / Sierpina, Victor; Wollschlaeger, Bernd; Blumenthal, Mark.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 68, No. 5, 01.09.2003, p. 923-926.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sierpina, V, Wollschlaeger, B & Blumenthal, M 2003, 'Ginkgo biloba', American Family Physician, vol. 68, no. 5, pp. 923-926.
Sierpina V, Wollschlaeger B, Blumenthal M. Ginkgo biloba. American Family Physician. 2003 Sep 1;68(5):923-926.
Sierpina, Victor ; Wollschlaeger, Bernd ; Blumenthal, Mark. / Ginkgo biloba. In: American Family Physician. 2003 ; Vol. 68, No. 5. pp. 923-926.
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