Glanders

Off to the races with Burkholderia mallei

Gregory C. Whitlock, D. Mark Estes, Alfredo Torres

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of the disease known as glanders, is primarily a disease affecting horses and is transmitted to humans by direct contact with infected animals. The use of B. mallei as a biological weapon has been reported and currently, there is no vaccine available for either humans or animals. Despite the history and highly infective nature of B. mallei, as well as its potential use as a bio-weapon, B. mallei research to understand the pathogenesis and the host responses to infection remains limited. Therefore, this minireview will focus on current efforts to elucidate B. mallei virulence, the associated host immune responses elicited during infection and discuss the feasibility of vaccine development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-122
Number of pages8
JournalFEMS Microbiology Letters
Volume277
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

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Burkholderia mallei
Glanders
Vaccines
Biological Warfare Agents
Horse Diseases
Weapons
Infection
Virulence
History
Research

Keywords

  • Burkholderia
  • Burkholderia mallei
  • Glanders
  • Immune responses
  • Virulence factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Glanders : Off to the races with Burkholderia mallei. / Whitlock, Gregory C.; Mark Estes, D.; Torres, Alfredo.

In: FEMS Microbiology Letters, Vol. 277, No. 2, 12.2007, p. 115-122.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whitlock, Gregory C. ; Mark Estes, D. ; Torres, Alfredo. / Glanders : Off to the races with Burkholderia mallei. In: FEMS Microbiology Letters. 2007 ; Vol. 277, No. 2. pp. 115-122.
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