Glucose uptake in brain during withdrawal from ethanol, phenobarbital, and diazepam

C. A. Marietta, M. J. Eckardt, Gerald Campbell, E. Majchrowicz, F. F. Weight

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The physiological basis of CNS hyperexcitability accompanying withdrawal syndromes is poorly understood. Evidence for increased neuronal activity in the CNS associated with withdrawal has been reported using both electrophysiological and neurochemical techniques. It has not been established, however, whether the alterations of CNS function are general or localized to specific functional regions of the brain, although some electrophysiological and biochemical studies suggest that localized changes may occur. The development of the 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) technique by Sokoloff et al. has provided an experimental method for studying localized changes in glucose metabolism throughout the brain. The authors have used the 2-DG technique to examine localized changes in glucose uptake in the brains of dependent rats undergoing withdrawal from ethanol, phenobarbital, and diazepam. The purpose of this paper is to review the qualitative observations in these studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-236
Number of pages4
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume10
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Phenobarbital
Diazepam
Brain
Ethanol
Deoxyglucose
Glucose
Metabolism
Rats

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Glucose uptake in brain during withdrawal from ethanol, phenobarbital, and diazepam. / Marietta, C. A.; Eckardt, M. J.; Campbell, Gerald; Majchrowicz, E.; Weight, F. F.

In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 10, No. 3, 1986, p. 233-236.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Marietta, CA, Eckardt, MJ, Campbell, G, Majchrowicz, E & Weight, FF 1986, 'Glucose uptake in brain during withdrawal from ethanol, phenobarbital, and diazepam', Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 233-236.
Marietta, C. A. ; Eckardt, M. J. ; Campbell, Gerald ; Majchrowicz, E. ; Weight, F. F. / Glucose uptake in brain during withdrawal from ethanol, phenobarbital, and diazepam. In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. 1986 ; Vol. 10, No. 3. pp. 233-236.
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