Glutamine protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity

Yihong Cao, Richard Kennedy, Vicki Klimberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Doxorubicin (DOX) dose-intensive therapy for breast cancer is limited by a cardiomyopathy that often results in overt congestive heart failure. We hypothesized that dietary glutamine (GLN) can diminish DOX-induced cardiotoxicity by maintaining tissue glutathione (GSH) levels and thus preventing the proposed mechanism of cardiac injury: oxidation. Methods. Forty-two female Fisher 344 rats were randomized into one of six groups: GLN + saline (SAL), GLN + DOX, freamine (FA) + SAL, FA + DOX, H2O + SAL, and H2O + DOX. Rats were pair-fed chow and gavaged with 1 g/kg/day GLN or an isonitrogenous amount of FA or H2O for 28 days. Rats were injected intravenously with a single dose of SAL or 9 mg/kg DOX on day 7 of gavage. At 28 days (21 days post-DOX), rats were sacrificed and blood and cardiac tissue were assayed for GLN and GSH content and lipid peroxidation (LP). Results. There were no differences in cardiac GSH levels and cardiac lipid peroxidation in GLN + SAL versus GLN + DOX groups. However, blood and cardiac GSH levels were significantly decreased in H2O + DOX and FA + DOX groups compared to controls (H2O + SAL and FA + SAL). Conclusion. These data suggest that dietary GLN supplementation may diminish DOX-induced oxidative damage and thus cardiotoxicity through upregulation of cardiac GSH metabolism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)178-182
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Glutamine
Doxorubicin
Lipid Peroxidation
Cardiotoxicity
Dietary Supplements
Cardiomyopathies
Glutathione
Up-Regulation
Heart Failure
amino-acid, glucose, and electrolyte solution
Breast Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Doxorubicin
  • Glutamine
  • Glutathione

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Glutamine protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. / Cao, Yihong; Kennedy, Richard; Klimberg, Vicki.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 85, No. 1, 1999, p. 178-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cao, Yihong ; Kennedy, Richard ; Klimberg, Vicki. / Glutamine protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 1999 ; Vol. 85, No. 1. pp. 178-182.
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