Gut microbiota-derived metabolites in the regulation of host immune responses and immune-related inflammatory diseases

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The gut microbiota has a critical role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Alterations in the intestinal microbiota and gut microbiota-derived metabolites have been recognized in many immune-related inflammatory disorders. These metabolites can be produced by gut microbiota from dietary components or by the host and can be modified by gut bacteria or synthesized de novo by gut bacteria. Gut microbiota-derived metabolites influence a plethora of immune cell responses, including T cells, B cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages. Some of these metabolites are involved in the pathogenesis of immune-related inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we review the role of microbiota-derived metabolites in regulating the functions of different immune cells and the pathogenesis of chronic immune-related inflammatory diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)866-877
Number of pages12
JournalCellular and Molecular Immunology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • B cells
  • T cells
  • autoimmune diseases
  • gut microbiota
  • metabolites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

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