Head lag in infancy

What is it telling us?

Roberta G. Pineda, Lauren C. Reynolds, Kristin Seefeldt, Claudia Hilton, Cynthia E. Rogers, Terrie E. Inder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective. To investigate changes in head lag across postmenstrual age and define associations between head lag and (1) perinatal exposures and (2) neurodevelopment. METHOD. Sixty-four infants born ≤30 wk gestation had head lag assessed before and at term-equivalent age. Neurobehavior was assessed at term age. At 2 yr, neurodevelopmental testing was conducted. RESULTS. Head lag decreased with advancing postmenstrual age, but 58% (n = 37) of infants continued to demonstrate head lag at term. Head lag was associated with longer stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (p =.009), inotrope use (p =.04), sepsis (p =.02), longer endotracheal intubation (p =.01), and cerebral injury (p =.006). Head lag was related to alterations in early neurobehavior (p

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Occupational Therapy
Volume70
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Head
Intratracheal Intubation
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Sepsis
Pregnancy
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Occupational Therapy

Cite this

Pineda, R. G., Reynolds, L. C., Seefeldt, K., Hilton, C., Rogers, C. E., & Inder, T. E. (2016). Head lag in infancy: What is it telling us? American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 70(1). https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2016.017558

Head lag in infancy : What is it telling us? / Pineda, Roberta G.; Reynolds, Lauren C.; Seefeldt, Kristin; Hilton, Claudia; Rogers, Cynthia E.; Inder, Terrie E.

In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, Vol. 70, No. 1, 01.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pineda, RG, Reynolds, LC, Seefeldt, K, Hilton, C, Rogers, CE & Inder, TE 2016, 'Head lag in infancy: What is it telling us?', American Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 70, no. 1. https://doi.org/10.5014/ajot.2016.017558
Pineda, Roberta G. ; Reynolds, Lauren C. ; Seefeldt, Kristin ; Hilton, Claudia ; Rogers, Cynthia E. ; Inder, Terrie E. / Head lag in infancy : What is it telling us?. In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy. 2016 ; Vol. 70, No. 1.
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