Health locus of control, acculturation, and health-related internet use among latinas

Angelica M. Roncancio, Abbey Berenson, Mahbubur Rahman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Among individuals residing in the United States, the Internet is the third most used source for obtaining health information. Little is known, however, about its use by Latinas. To understand health-related Internet use among Latinas, the authors examined it within the theoretical frameworks of health locus of control and acculturation. The authors predicted that acculturation would serve as a mediator between health locus of control and health-related Internet use, age and health-related Internet use, income and health-related Internet use, and education and health-related Internet use. Data were collected via a 25-minute self-report questionnaire. The sample consisted of 932 young (M age = 21.27 years), low-income Latinas. Using structural equation modeling, the authors observed that acculturation partially mediated the relation between health locus of control and health-related Internet use and fully mediated the relations among age, income, and Internet use. An internal health locus of control (p <.001), younger age (p <.001), and higher income (p <.001) were associated with higher levels of acculturation. Higher levels of acculturation (p <.001) and an internal health locus of control (p <.004) predicted health-related Internet use. The Internet is a powerful tool that can be used to effectively disseminate information to Latinas with limited access to health care professionals. These findings can inform the design of Internet-based health information dissemination studies targeting Latinas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)631-640
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Internal-External Control
locus of control
acculturation
Hispanic Americans
Internet
Health
health
health information
income
Information dissemination
Health Services Accessibility
Information Dissemination
Health Education
Self Report
Health care
low income

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Communication

Cite this

Health locus of control, acculturation, and health-related internet use among latinas. / Roncancio, Angelica M.; Berenson, Abbey; Rahman, Mahbubur.

In: Journal of Health Communication, Vol. 17, No. 6, 01.07.2012, p. 631-640.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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