Health-related social disengagement in elderly patients

Association with subsequent disability and survival

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE - We examined the relationship between health-related social disengagements, as opposed to disengagements related to financial and other non-health-related factors, and subsequent risk of disability and death among initially nondisabled elderly diabetic patients enrolled in Medicare Managed Care plans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We used data from the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) Cohort 1 Baseline (1998) and Cohort 1 Follow-Up (2000). Through mail and telephone surveys, trained interviewers collected information on sociodemographic variables, physical and mental health functioning (using Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 [SF-36]), activities of daily living (ADL), and medical conditions. This study reported on diabetic subjects aged ≥65 years with no ADL disability at baseline (n = 8,949). Health-related social disengagement (degree to which physical health or emotional problems interfere with social activities) was derived from the social functioning subscale of SF-36 (range 0-100; higher scores depicting better social functioning). RESULTS - For each 10-point increase in social functioning score at baseline, older diabetic subjects in our study experienced an 18% less chance of any ADL disability (odds ratio [OR] 0.82, 95% CI 0.75-0.89; P < 0.001) and a 12% less chance of death (0.88, 0.78-1.00; P = 0.043) over a 2-year period, adjusting for demographic factors, comorbidities, depression, and general health (assessed by the SF-36). CONCLUSIONS - Among initially nondisabled older diabetic subjects, health-related interferences with social activities at baseline may be early warning signs of subsequent ADL disability and premature death, independent of other measures of health status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1630-1637
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume27
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004

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Activities of Daily Living
Survival
Health
Medicare
Premature Mortality
Social Conditions
Postal Service
Managed Care Programs
Health Surveys
Telephone
Health Status
Comorbidity
Mental Health
Research Design
Odds Ratio
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Interviews
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

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title = "Health-related social disengagement in elderly patients: Association with subsequent disability and survival",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE - We examined the relationship between health-related social disengagements, as opposed to disengagements related to financial and other non-health-related factors, and subsequent risk of disability and death among initially nondisabled elderly diabetic patients enrolled in Medicare Managed Care plans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We used data from the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) Cohort 1 Baseline (1998) and Cohort 1 Follow-Up (2000). Through mail and telephone surveys, trained interviewers collected information on sociodemographic variables, physical and mental health functioning (using Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 [SF-36]), activities of daily living (ADL), and medical conditions. This study reported on diabetic subjects aged ≥65 years with no ADL disability at baseline (n = 8,949). Health-related social disengagement (degree to which physical health or emotional problems interfere with social activities) was derived from the social functioning subscale of SF-36 (range 0-100; higher scores depicting better social functioning). RESULTS - For each 10-point increase in social functioning score at baseline, older diabetic subjects in our study experienced an 18{\%} less chance of any ADL disability (odds ratio [OR] 0.82, 95{\%} CI 0.75-0.89; P < 0.001) and a 12{\%} less chance of death (0.88, 0.78-1.00; P = 0.043) over a 2-year period, adjusting for demographic factors, comorbidities, depression, and general health (assessed by the SF-36). CONCLUSIONS - Among initially nondisabled older diabetic subjects, health-related interferences with social activities at baseline may be early warning signs of subsequent ADL disability and premature death, independent of other measures of health status.",
author = "Kuo, {Yong Fang} and Mukaila Raji and Mary Peek and James Goodwin",
year = "2004",
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doi = "10.2337/diacare.27.7.1630",
language = "English (US)",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Health-related social disengagement in elderly patients

T2 - Association with subsequent disability and survival

AU - Kuo, Yong Fang

AU - Raji, Mukaila

AU - Peek, Mary

AU - Goodwin, James

PY - 2004/7

Y1 - 2004/7

N2 - OBJECTIVE - We examined the relationship between health-related social disengagements, as opposed to disengagements related to financial and other non-health-related factors, and subsequent risk of disability and death among initially nondisabled elderly diabetic patients enrolled in Medicare Managed Care plans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We used data from the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) Cohort 1 Baseline (1998) and Cohort 1 Follow-Up (2000). Through mail and telephone surveys, trained interviewers collected information on sociodemographic variables, physical and mental health functioning (using Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 [SF-36]), activities of daily living (ADL), and medical conditions. This study reported on diabetic subjects aged ≥65 years with no ADL disability at baseline (n = 8,949). Health-related social disengagement (degree to which physical health or emotional problems interfere with social activities) was derived from the social functioning subscale of SF-36 (range 0-100; higher scores depicting better social functioning). RESULTS - For each 10-point increase in social functioning score at baseline, older diabetic subjects in our study experienced an 18% less chance of any ADL disability (odds ratio [OR] 0.82, 95% CI 0.75-0.89; P < 0.001) and a 12% less chance of death (0.88, 0.78-1.00; P = 0.043) over a 2-year period, adjusting for demographic factors, comorbidities, depression, and general health (assessed by the SF-36). CONCLUSIONS - Among initially nondisabled older diabetic subjects, health-related interferences with social activities at baseline may be early warning signs of subsequent ADL disability and premature death, independent of other measures of health status.

AB - OBJECTIVE - We examined the relationship between health-related social disengagements, as opposed to disengagements related to financial and other non-health-related factors, and subsequent risk of disability and death among initially nondisabled elderly diabetic patients enrolled in Medicare Managed Care plans. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We used data from the Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) Cohort 1 Baseline (1998) and Cohort 1 Follow-Up (2000). Through mail and telephone surveys, trained interviewers collected information on sociodemographic variables, physical and mental health functioning (using Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 [SF-36]), activities of daily living (ADL), and medical conditions. This study reported on diabetic subjects aged ≥65 years with no ADL disability at baseline (n = 8,949). Health-related social disengagement (degree to which physical health or emotional problems interfere with social activities) was derived from the social functioning subscale of SF-36 (range 0-100; higher scores depicting better social functioning). RESULTS - For each 10-point increase in social functioning score at baseline, older diabetic subjects in our study experienced an 18% less chance of any ADL disability (odds ratio [OR] 0.82, 95% CI 0.75-0.89; P < 0.001) and a 12% less chance of death (0.88, 0.78-1.00; P = 0.043) over a 2-year period, adjusting for demographic factors, comorbidities, depression, and general health (assessed by the SF-36). CONCLUSIONS - Among initially nondisabled older diabetic subjects, health-related interferences with social activities at baseline may be early warning signs of subsequent ADL disability and premature death, independent of other measures of health status.

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U2 - 10.2337/diacare.27.7.1630

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JO - Diabetes Care

JF - Diabetes Care

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