Healthcare resource utilization in bipolar depression compared with unipolar depression: Results of a United States population-based study

Mark A. Frye, Joseph R. Calabrese, Michael L. Reed, Robert M.A. Hirschfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: This study examined healthcare utilization in the past year by subjects who screened positive for bipolar versus unipolar depression. Method: A self-administered survey was completed in 2002 by a United States population-based sample. Respondents were categorized into one of three subgroups: bipolar depressed screen positive (BP DEP+, n=394); unipolar depressed screen positive (UP DEP+, n=794); and control subjects (n=1,612). Results: For depressive symptoms in the past year, BP DEP+ respondents were significantly more likely than UP DEP+ respondents to report a healthcare visit to a number of diverse care providers. In analyses controlled for demographics and depression severity, the differences in psychiatric hospitalization, psychologist/counselor outpatient visit, substance abuse/social services visit, and number of emergency room visits remained significant between BP DEP+ and UP DEP+ respondents. Conclusion: Subjects with self-reported bipolar depression sought care more often from a number of diverse healthcare resources than subjects with self-reported unipolar depression. These findings underscore the morbidity associated with bipolar depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)704-710
Number of pages7
JournalCNS Spectrums
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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