Hearing Loss in the Elderly

Rohan Patel, Brian McKinnon

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Presbycusis, or age-related hearing loss (ARHL), is the result of physiologic and pathologic changes associated with advancing age. ARHL presents typically with a high-frequency hearing loss, which contributes to greater trouble hearing consonants within words. Consonants convey the bulk of meaning within a word, and this loss of linguistic information results in complaints associated with ARHL. Hearing aids and cochlear implants significantly improve the lives of older adults with hearing loss, in particular, those with depression and dementia. Successful current research in gene therapy, pharmacotherapy, and stems cells holds the promise of being able to restore native cochlear function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-174
Number of pages12
JournalClinics in Geriatric Medicine
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hearing Loss
Presbycusis
High-Frequency Hearing Loss
Hearing Aids
Cochlear Implants
Cochlea
Linguistics
Genetic Therapy
Hearing
Dementia
Stem Cells
Depression
Drug Therapy
Research

Keywords

  • Age-related hearing loss
  • Cochlear implants
  • Elderly
  • Geriatrics
  • Hearing aids
  • Osseointegrated auditory implants
  • Presbycusis
  • Regenerative therapies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Hearing Loss in the Elderly. / Patel, Rohan; McKinnon, Brian.

In: Clinics in Geriatric Medicine, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.05.2018, p. 163-174.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Patel, Rohan ; McKinnon, Brian. / Hearing Loss in the Elderly. In: Clinics in Geriatric Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 163-174.
@article{35199b814f8a4089b6f69f073d1ba5f7,
title = "Hearing Loss in the Elderly",
abstract = "Presbycusis, or age-related hearing loss (ARHL), is the result of physiologic and pathologic changes associated with advancing age. ARHL presents typically with a high-frequency hearing loss, which contributes to greater trouble hearing consonants within words. Consonants convey the bulk of meaning within a word, and this loss of linguistic information results in complaints associated with ARHL. Hearing aids and cochlear implants significantly improve the lives of older adults with hearing loss, in particular, those with depression and dementia. Successful current research in gene therapy, pharmacotherapy, and stems cells holds the promise of being able to restore native cochlear function.",
keywords = "Age-related hearing loss, Cochlear implants, Elderly, Geriatrics, Hearing aids, Osseointegrated auditory implants, Presbycusis, Regenerative therapies",
author = "Rohan Patel and Brian McKinnon",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.cger.2018.01.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "163--174",
journal = "Clinics in Geriatric Medicine",
issn = "0749-0690",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hearing Loss in the Elderly

AU - Patel, Rohan

AU - McKinnon, Brian

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - Presbycusis, or age-related hearing loss (ARHL), is the result of physiologic and pathologic changes associated with advancing age. ARHL presents typically with a high-frequency hearing loss, which contributes to greater trouble hearing consonants within words. Consonants convey the bulk of meaning within a word, and this loss of linguistic information results in complaints associated with ARHL. Hearing aids and cochlear implants significantly improve the lives of older adults with hearing loss, in particular, those with depression and dementia. Successful current research in gene therapy, pharmacotherapy, and stems cells holds the promise of being able to restore native cochlear function.

AB - Presbycusis, or age-related hearing loss (ARHL), is the result of physiologic and pathologic changes associated with advancing age. ARHL presents typically with a high-frequency hearing loss, which contributes to greater trouble hearing consonants within words. Consonants convey the bulk of meaning within a word, and this loss of linguistic information results in complaints associated with ARHL. Hearing aids and cochlear implants significantly improve the lives of older adults with hearing loss, in particular, those with depression and dementia. Successful current research in gene therapy, pharmacotherapy, and stems cells holds the promise of being able to restore native cochlear function.

KW - Age-related hearing loss

KW - Cochlear implants

KW - Elderly

KW - Geriatrics

KW - Hearing aids

KW - Osseointegrated auditory implants

KW - Presbycusis

KW - Regenerative therapies

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041924599&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85041924599&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cger.2018.01.001

DO - 10.1016/j.cger.2018.01.001

M3 - Review article

C2 - 29661329

AN - SCOPUS:85041924599

VL - 34

SP - 163

EP - 174

JO - Clinics in Geriatric Medicine

JF - Clinics in Geriatric Medicine

SN - 0749-0690

IS - 2

ER -