Hearing problems in Mexican american elderly

Zoreh Davanipour, Nicole M. Lu, Michael Lichtenstein, Kyriakos Markides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate hearing problems in a sample of elderly Mexican Americans. Study Design: A longitudinal field study of a cohort of 3,050 subjects with in-person baseline and a 2-year follow-up. Population- based, cross-sectional, weighted data were analyzed. Settings and Subjects: Hispanic Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly (H- EPESE) consisting of Mexican Americans aged 65 and older provided basic health data using area probability sampling in five southwestern states during 1993 and 1994. Main Outcome Measures: Information was collected regarding demographics, medical conditions, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Hearing problems were identified through a series of self-perceived hearing problem questions, hearing aid use, and inability to hear a normal voice. Results: A hearing problem was identified in 24.5% of this cohort (weighted, 748/3,049). Statistical analysis using a multiple logistic regression model was performed to identify factors jointly associated with hearing problems. Age group (odds ratio [OR] = 2.7, p < 0.0001), male sex (OR = 1.9, p 0.0001), hypertension (OR = 1.4, p < 0.001), arthritis (OR = 1.5, p < 0.0005), significant depressive symptomatology (OR = 1.4, p < 0.002), and ever having consumed alcohol (OR = 1.4, p < 0.005) were jointly statistically significantly associated with hearing problems. Number of cigarettes smoked daily (e.g., 0, 1-10, 11-20, etc.) was nearly significantly associated with a hearing problem in the multivariate model (OR = 1.1 for each increased in category, p < 0.07). Conclusions: Hearing problems are common in this population. Control of hypertension, an amelioration of arthritis, and decreasing the consumption of alcohol and cigarettes may lower the likelihood of development of a hearing problem. Initial depressive symptomatology may have occurred subsequent to the hearing loss. A longitudinal study would allow determination of the direction of causation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)168-172
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Otology
Volume21
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 2000

Fingerprint

Hearing
Odds Ratio
Tobacco Products
Alcohol Drinking
Arthritis
Longitudinal Studies
Logistic Models
Population
Hypertension
Hearing Aids
Sex Ratio
Hearing Loss
Hispanic Americans
Causality
Epidemiologic Studies
Age Groups
Smoking
Alcohols
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Elderly
  • Epidemiology
  • Hearing problems
  • Mexican americans

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Davanipour, Z., Lu, N. M., Lichtenstein, M., & Markides, K. (2000). Hearing problems in Mexican american elderly. American Journal of Otology, 21(2), 168-172.

Hearing problems in Mexican american elderly. / Davanipour, Zoreh; Lu, Nicole M.; Lichtenstein, Michael; Markides, Kyriakos.

In: American Journal of Otology, Vol. 21, No. 2, 03.2000, p. 168-172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davanipour, Z, Lu, NM, Lichtenstein, M & Markides, K 2000, 'Hearing problems in Mexican american elderly', American Journal of Otology, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 168-172.
Davanipour Z, Lu NM, Lichtenstein M, Markides K. Hearing problems in Mexican american elderly. American Journal of Otology. 2000 Mar;21(2):168-172.
Davanipour, Zoreh ; Lu, Nicole M. ; Lichtenstein, Michael ; Markides, Kyriakos. / Hearing problems in Mexican american elderly. In: American Journal of Otology. 2000 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 168-172.
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