Heart failure patients' perceptions and use of technology to manage disease symptoms

Amanda K. Hall, Virginia Dodd, Amy Harris, Kara McArthur, Clifford Dacso, Lara M. Colton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Technology use for symptom management is beneficial for both patients and physicians. Widespread acceptance of technology use in healthcare fuels continued development of technology with ever-increasing sophistication. Although acceptance of technology use in healthcare by medical professionals is evident, less is known about the perceptions, preferences, and use of technology by heart failure (HF) patients. This study explores patients' perceptions and current use of technology for managing HF symptoms (MHFS).

MATERIALS AND METHODS: A qualitative analysis of in-depth individual interviews using a constant comparative approach for emerging themes was conducted. Fifteen participants (mean age, 64.43 years) with HF were recruited from hospitals, cardiology clinics, and community groups.

RESULTS: All study participants reported use of a home monitoring device, such as an ambulatory blood pressure device or bathroom scale. The majority of participants reported not accessing online resources for additional MHFS information. However, several participants stated their belief that technology would be useful for MHFS. Participants reported increased access to care, earlier indication of a worsening condition, increased knowledge, and greater convenience as potential benefits of technology use while managing HF symptoms. For most participants financial cost, access issues, satisfaction with current self-care routine, mistrust of technology, and reliance on routine management by their current healthcare provider precluded their use of technology for MHFS.

CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge about HF patients' perceptions of technology use for self-care and better understanding of issues associated with technology access can aid in the development of effective health behavior interventions for individuals who are MHFS and may result in increased compliance, better outcomes, and lower healthcare costs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)324-331
Number of pages8
JournalTelemedicine journal and e-health : the official journal of the American Telemedicine Association
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Heart Failure
Technology
Self Care
Toilet Facilities
Delivery of Health Care
Equipment and Supplies
Health Behavior
Cardiology
Health Personnel
Health Care Costs
Compliance
Interviews
Blood Pressure
Physicians
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Heart failure patients' perceptions and use of technology to manage disease symptoms. / Hall, Amanda K.; Dodd, Virginia; Harris, Amy; McArthur, Kara; Dacso, Clifford; Colton, Lara M.

In: Telemedicine journal and e-health : the official journal of the American Telemedicine Association, Vol. 20, No. 4, 01.04.2014, p. 324-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hall, Amanda K. ; Dodd, Virginia ; Harris, Amy ; McArthur, Kara ; Dacso, Clifford ; Colton, Lara M. / Heart failure patients' perceptions and use of technology to manage disease symptoms. In: Telemedicine journal and e-health : the official journal of the American Telemedicine Association. 2014 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 324-331.
@article{94e3abb100df4b238e5c438d5dda8f9c,
title = "Heart failure patients' perceptions and use of technology to manage disease symptoms",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Technology use for symptom management is beneficial for both patients and physicians. Widespread acceptance of technology use in healthcare fuels continued development of technology with ever-increasing sophistication. Although acceptance of technology use in healthcare by medical professionals is evident, less is known about the perceptions, preferences, and use of technology by heart failure (HF) patients. This study explores patients' perceptions and current use of technology for managing HF symptoms (MHFS).MATERIALS AND METHODS: A qualitative analysis of in-depth individual interviews using a constant comparative approach for emerging themes was conducted. Fifteen participants (mean age, 64.43 years) with HF were recruited from hospitals, cardiology clinics, and community groups.RESULTS: All study participants reported use of a home monitoring device, such as an ambulatory blood pressure device or bathroom scale. The majority of participants reported not accessing online resources for additional MHFS information. However, several participants stated their belief that technology would be useful for MHFS. Participants reported increased access to care, earlier indication of a worsening condition, increased knowledge, and greater convenience as potential benefits of technology use while managing HF symptoms. For most participants financial cost, access issues, satisfaction with current self-care routine, mistrust of technology, and reliance on routine management by their current healthcare provider precluded their use of technology for MHFS.CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge about HF patients' perceptions of technology use for self-care and better understanding of issues associated with technology access can aid in the development of effective health behavior interventions for individuals who are MHFS and may result in increased compliance, better outcomes, and lower healthcare costs.",
author = "Hall, {Amanda K.} and Virginia Dodd and Amy Harris and Kara McArthur and Clifford Dacso and Colton, {Lara M.}",
year = "2014",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/tmj.2013.0146",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "324--331",
journal = "Telemedicine and e-Health",
issn = "1530-5627",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Heart failure patients' perceptions and use of technology to manage disease symptoms

AU - Hall, Amanda K.

AU - Dodd, Virginia

AU - Harris, Amy

AU - McArthur, Kara

AU - Dacso, Clifford

AU - Colton, Lara M.

PY - 2014/4/1

Y1 - 2014/4/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Technology use for symptom management is beneficial for both patients and physicians. Widespread acceptance of technology use in healthcare fuels continued development of technology with ever-increasing sophistication. Although acceptance of technology use in healthcare by medical professionals is evident, less is known about the perceptions, preferences, and use of technology by heart failure (HF) patients. This study explores patients' perceptions and current use of technology for managing HF symptoms (MHFS).MATERIALS AND METHODS: A qualitative analysis of in-depth individual interviews using a constant comparative approach for emerging themes was conducted. Fifteen participants (mean age, 64.43 years) with HF were recruited from hospitals, cardiology clinics, and community groups.RESULTS: All study participants reported use of a home monitoring device, such as an ambulatory blood pressure device or bathroom scale. The majority of participants reported not accessing online resources for additional MHFS information. However, several participants stated their belief that technology would be useful for MHFS. Participants reported increased access to care, earlier indication of a worsening condition, increased knowledge, and greater convenience as potential benefits of technology use while managing HF symptoms. For most participants financial cost, access issues, satisfaction with current self-care routine, mistrust of technology, and reliance on routine management by their current healthcare provider precluded their use of technology for MHFS.CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge about HF patients' perceptions of technology use for self-care and better understanding of issues associated with technology access can aid in the development of effective health behavior interventions for individuals who are MHFS and may result in increased compliance, better outcomes, and lower healthcare costs.

AB - BACKGROUND: Technology use for symptom management is beneficial for both patients and physicians. Widespread acceptance of technology use in healthcare fuels continued development of technology with ever-increasing sophistication. Although acceptance of technology use in healthcare by medical professionals is evident, less is known about the perceptions, preferences, and use of technology by heart failure (HF) patients. This study explores patients' perceptions and current use of technology for managing HF symptoms (MHFS).MATERIALS AND METHODS: A qualitative analysis of in-depth individual interviews using a constant comparative approach for emerging themes was conducted. Fifteen participants (mean age, 64.43 years) with HF were recruited from hospitals, cardiology clinics, and community groups.RESULTS: All study participants reported use of a home monitoring device, such as an ambulatory blood pressure device or bathroom scale. The majority of participants reported not accessing online resources for additional MHFS information. However, several participants stated their belief that technology would be useful for MHFS. Participants reported increased access to care, earlier indication of a worsening condition, increased knowledge, and greater convenience as potential benefits of technology use while managing HF symptoms. For most participants financial cost, access issues, satisfaction with current self-care routine, mistrust of technology, and reliance on routine management by their current healthcare provider precluded their use of technology for MHFS.CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge about HF patients' perceptions of technology use for self-care and better understanding of issues associated with technology access can aid in the development of effective health behavior interventions for individuals who are MHFS and may result in increased compliance, better outcomes, and lower healthcare costs.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84964316114&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84964316114&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/tmj.2013.0146

DO - 10.1089/tmj.2013.0146

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 324

EP - 331

JO - Telemedicine and e-Health

JF - Telemedicine and e-Health

SN - 1530-5627

IS - 4

ER -