Hemostatic derangement produced by Rift Valley fever virus in rhesus monkeys.

T. M. Cosgriff, J. C. Morrill, G. B. Jennings, L. A. Hodgson, M. V. Slayter, P. H. Gibbs, C. J. Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an important cause of disease in animals and humans in sub-Saharan Africa. In a small percentage of human cases, the disease is complicated by hemorrhage, which often is associated with a fatal outcome. Inoculation of rhesus monkeys with the Zagazig Hospital strain of RVF virus produced a clinical picture similar to illness in humans. Ten of 17 monkeys developed clinical evidence of hemostatic impairment. When coagulation tests were performed, this group of monkeys had significant abnormalities, including evidence for disseminated intravascular coagulation. These abnormalities were much less pronounced in the remaining seven monkeys-whose only sign of illness was transient fever-and, in general, they paralleled the level of viremia and the degree of elevation in levels of serum hepatic enzymes. Autopsy of the three monkeys with severe disease revealed hepatic necrosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalReviews of Infectious Diseases
Volume11 Suppl 4
StatePublished - May 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Rift Valley fever virus
Hemostatics
Macaca mulatta
Haplorhini
Rift Valley Fever
Animal Diseases
Fatal Outcome
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation
Africa South of the Sahara
Liver
Viremia
Autopsy
Fever
Necrosis
Hemorrhage
Enzymes
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Cosgriff, T. M., Morrill, J. C., Jennings, G. B., Hodgson, L. A., Slayter, M. V., Gibbs, P. H., & Peters, C. J. (1989). Hemostatic derangement produced by Rift Valley fever virus in rhesus monkeys. Reviews of Infectious Diseases, 11 Suppl 4.

Hemostatic derangement produced by Rift Valley fever virus in rhesus monkeys. / Cosgriff, T. M.; Morrill, J. C.; Jennings, G. B.; Hodgson, L. A.; Slayter, M. V.; Gibbs, P. H.; Peters, C. J.

In: Reviews of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 11 Suppl 4, 05.1989.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cosgriff, TM, Morrill, JC, Jennings, GB, Hodgson, LA, Slayter, MV, Gibbs, PH & Peters, CJ 1989, 'Hemostatic derangement produced by Rift Valley fever virus in rhesus monkeys.', Reviews of Infectious Diseases, vol. 11 Suppl 4.
Cosgriff TM, Morrill JC, Jennings GB, Hodgson LA, Slayter MV, Gibbs PH et al. Hemostatic derangement produced by Rift Valley fever virus in rhesus monkeys. Reviews of Infectious Diseases. 1989 May;11 Suppl 4.
Cosgriff, T. M. ; Morrill, J. C. ; Jennings, G. B. ; Hodgson, L. A. ; Slayter, M. V. ; Gibbs, P. H. ; Peters, C. J. / Hemostatic derangement produced by Rift Valley fever virus in rhesus monkeys. In: Reviews of Infectious Diseases. 1989 ; Vol. 11 Suppl 4.
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