Hepatitis A vaccination in healthcare personnel

Praveen Guturu, Luca Cicalese, Andrea Duchini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and aims. Despite effective vaccine available, hepatitis A remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide including acute liver failure, transplantation and death. Vaccination rates for hepatitis A in the general population are low. Rates of hepatitis A vaccination in healthcare personnel (HCP) are unknown. We studied vaccination rate to hepatitis A in a cohort of HCP at a large US academic center. Material and methods. An anonymous survey was circulated between 499 HCP at-risk of hepatitis A exposure at our Institution. Results were corrected for non-response rate and compared with the general US population using the 2007 CDC-National Immunization Survey. Rate of hepatitis A vaccination was compared with Institutional rate of vaccination for the Influenza 2009-2010 season. Results. Rate of vaccination for hepatitis A in HCP was 28.8% (response rate 41.4%; 207/499), with 58.9% having completed the full series and 24.7% being tested for post-vaccination immunity. Acceptance rate among non-vaccinated subjects was 70.7%. HCP hepatitis A vaccination rate was statistically greater than the national general population (28.8 vs. 12.1%, p ≤ 0.031). A statistically significant greater vaccination rate was found among USborn responders vs. foreign-born HCP (34.3 vs. 19.3%, p = 0.0324). Vaccination for hepatitis A was statistically inferior to that of Influenza (28.8 vs. 90%; P = 0.01). Conclusions. HCP have statistically higher vaccination rate for hepatitis A than the general population, but overall protection remains suboptimal with vaccination rate below those for mandatory vaccines. Further studies to determine whether hepatitis A vaccine is cost-effective in HCP are recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-329
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Hepatology
Volume11
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Hepatitis A
Vaccination
Delivery of Health Care
Hepatitis A Vaccines
Human Influenza
Population
Acute Liver Failure
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Liver Transplantation
Immunity
Immunization
Vaccines

Keywords

  • Healthcare associated infections
  • Healthcare workers
  • Hepatitis A
  • Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Hepatitis A vaccination in healthcare personnel. / Guturu, Praveen; Cicalese, Luca; Duchini, Andrea.

In: Annals of Hepatology, Vol. 11, No. 3, 2012, p. 326-329.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background and aims. Despite effective vaccine available, hepatitis A remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide including acute liver failure, transplantation and death. Vaccination rates for hepatitis A in the general population are low. Rates of hepatitis A vaccination in healthcare personnel (HCP) are unknown. We studied vaccination rate to hepatitis A in a cohort of HCP at a large US academic center. Material and methods. An anonymous survey was circulated between 499 HCP at-risk of hepatitis A exposure at our Institution. Results were corrected for non-response rate and compared with the general US population using the 2007 CDC-National Immunization Survey. Rate of hepatitis A vaccination was compared with Institutional rate of vaccination for the Influenza 2009-2010 season. Results. Rate of vaccination for hepatitis A in HCP was 28.8{\%} (response rate 41.4{\%}; 207/499), with 58.9{\%} having completed the full series and 24.7{\%} being tested for post-vaccination immunity. Acceptance rate among non-vaccinated subjects was 70.7{\%}. HCP hepatitis A vaccination rate was statistically greater than the national general population (28.8 vs. 12.1{\%}, p ≤ 0.031). A statistically significant greater vaccination rate was found among USborn responders vs. foreign-born HCP (34.3 vs. 19.3{\%}, p = 0.0324). Vaccination for hepatitis A was statistically inferior to that of Influenza (28.8 vs. 90{\%}; P = 0.01). Conclusions. HCP have statistically higher vaccination rate for hepatitis A than the general population, but overall protection remains suboptimal with vaccination rate below those for mandatory vaccines. Further studies to determine whether hepatitis A vaccine is cost-effective in HCP are recommended.",
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