Hispanic women and aids: Gendered risk factors and clinical implications

Yolanda Davila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current theory and research indicate that Hispanic women's increased risk for AIDS is due to sociocultural and psychological factors that are influenced by gender. Hispanic women's low social status limits their ability to negotiate safer sex behaviors for AIDS prevention. Female gender identity, based upon the desire for interpersonal attachment, places Hispanic women at risk for AIDS through a fear of abandonment by male sexual partners who perceive safer sex behaviors as unmasculine. Male sexual partners' beliefs, practices, and behaviors, such as bisexuality and the practice of anal intercourse, increase Hispanic women's AIDS risk. The experience of involuntary sexual encounters and the lack of power to determine sexual behaviors and practices within these encounters also place Hispanic women at risk for AIDS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)635-646
Number of pages12
JournalIssues in Mental Health Nursing
Volume21
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Sexual Behavior
Safe Sex
Sexual Partners
Bisexuality
Aptitude
Fear
Psychology
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Hispanic women and aids : Gendered risk factors and clinical implications. / Davila, Yolanda.

In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 21, No. 6, 2000, p. 635-646.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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