HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein stimulates viral transcription and increases the infectivity of the progeny virus through the manipulation of cellular machinery

Xiaozhuo Ran, Zhujun Ao, Adriana Trajtman, Wayne Xu, Gary Kobinger, Yoav Keynan, Xiaojian Yao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

During HIV infection, large amounts of progeny viral particles, including infectious virus and a large proportion of defective viral particles, are produced. Despite of the critical role of the infectious viruses in infection and pathogenesis in vivo, whether and how those defective viral particles, especially the virus-associated envelope glycoprotein (vEnv), would impact viral infection remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the effect of vEnv on HIV-infected T cells and demonstrated that the vEnv was able to stimulate HIV transcription in HIV-infected cells, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from HIV patients. This vEnv-mediated HIV transcription activation is mediated primarily through the interaction between vEnv and CD4/coreceptors (CCR5 or CXCR4). Through transcriptome analysis, we found that numerous cellular gene products involved in various signaling pathways were modulated by vEnv. Among them, we have further identified a cellular microRNA miR181A2, which is downregulated upon vEnv treatment, resulting in increased HIV LTR histone H3 acetylation and HIV transcription. Furthermore, we also found a vEnv-modulated cellular histone deacetylase, HDAC10, whose downregulation is associated with the increased infectivity of progeny viruses. Altogether, these findings provide evidence of the important role vEnv plays in modulating cellular environments and facilitating HIV expression and infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number9487
JournalScientific reports
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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