Human biovibrations: Assessment of human life signs, motor activity, and cognitive performance using wrist-mounted actigraphy

Michael B. Russo, Alexander Vo, Robert Labutta, Ian Black, William Campbell, Jody Greene, James McGnee, Daniel Redmond

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The application of miniature motion sensors (accelerometers) to study the macro- (gross) and micro- (barely discernible) activities associated with human motion has been termed actigraphy. In countless human sleep studies, actigraphy has mostly been applied to distinguish between when a person is asleep or awake. Use of sleep/wake information has been applied to the development of mathematical models that aim to predict aspects of cognitive performance. However, wrist-mounted actigraphy potentially has many more applications to cognitive and physical assessment beyond sleep/wake discrimination. For example, studies reveal that micro-miniature accelerometric sensors can discriminate heart rate, breathing, and life cessation (death) via actigraphically measured biovibration signals. This paper briefly reviews the development of wrist-mounted actigraphy; presents the data showing wrist-monitored ballistocardioimpulses, respirations, and life-signs signals; discusses the application of sophisticated signal processing for new clinical, operational, and cognitive-assessment-related applications; and concludes with recommendations for further research for demodulating the complex actigram signal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAviation Space and Environmental Medicine
Volume76
Issue number7 II
StatePublished - Jul 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Actigraphy
Wrist
Motor Activity
Sleep
Respiration
Sensors
Accelerometers
Macros
Signal processing
Theoretical Models
Heart Rate
Mathematical models
Research

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Cognition
  • Coma
  • Life signs
  • Operational performance
  • Physiological status monitoring
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Pollution
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Human biovibrations : Assessment of human life signs, motor activity, and cognitive performance using wrist-mounted actigraphy. / Russo, Michael B.; Vo, Alexander; Labutta, Robert; Black, Ian; Campbell, William; Greene, Jody; McGnee, James; Redmond, Daniel.

In: Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 76, No. 7 II, 07.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Russo, Michael B. ; Vo, Alexander ; Labutta, Robert ; Black, Ian ; Campbell, William ; Greene, Jody ; McGnee, James ; Redmond, Daniel. / Human biovibrations : Assessment of human life signs, motor activity, and cognitive performance using wrist-mounted actigraphy. In: Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 76, No. 7 II.
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