Human biovibrations: Assessment of human life signs, motor activity, and cognitive performance using wrist-mounted actigraphy

Michael B. Russo, Alexander Vo, Robert Labutta, Ian Black, William Campbell, Jody Greene, James McGnee, Daniel Redmond

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The application of miniature motion sensors (accelerometers) to study the macro- (gross) and micro- (barely discernible) activities associated with human motion has been termed actigraphy. In countless human sleep studies, actigraphy has mostly been applied to distinguish between when a person is asleep or awake. Use of sleep/wake information has been applied to the development of mathematical models that aim to predict aspects of cognitive performance. However, wrist-mounted actigraphy potentially has many more applications to cognitive and physical assessment beyond sleep/wake discrimination. For example, studies reveal that micro-miniature accelerometric sensors can discriminate heart rate, breathing, and life cessation (death) via actigraphically measured biovibration signals. This paper briefly reviews the development of wrist-mounted actigraphy; presents the data showing wrist-monitored ballistocardioimpulses, respirations, and life-signs signals; discusses the application of sophisticated signal processing for new clinical, operational, and cognitive-assessment-related applications; and concludes with recommendations for further research for demodulating the complex actigram signal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)C64-C74
JournalAviation Space and Environmental Medicine
Volume76
Issue number7 II
StatePublished - Jul 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Actigraphy
  • Cognition
  • Coma
  • Life signs
  • Operational performance
  • Physiological status monitoring
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Human biovibrations: Assessment of human life signs, motor activity, and cognitive performance using wrist-mounted actigraphy'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Russo, M. B., Vo, A., Labutta, R., Black, I., Campbell, W., Greene, J., McGnee, J., & Redmond, D. (2005). Human biovibrations: Assessment of human life signs, motor activity, and cognitive performance using wrist-mounted actigraphy. Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine, 76(7 II), C64-C74.