Human mitochondrial oxidative capacity is acutely impaired after burn trauma

Melanie G. Cree, Ricki Y. Fram, David Herndon, Ting Qian, Carlos Angel, Justin M. Green, Ronald Mlcak, Asle Aarsland, Robert R. Wolfe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Mitochondrial proteins and genes are damaged after burn injury in animals and are assessed in human burn patients in this study. Methods: The rates of maximal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity (adenosine triphosphate production) and uncoupled oxidation (heat production) for both palmitate and pyruvate were measured in muscle biopsies from 40 children sustaining burns on more than 40% of their body surface area and from 13 healthy children controls. Results: Maximal mitochondrial oxidation of pyruvate and palmitate were reduced in burn patients compared with controls (4.0 ± .2:1.9 ± .1 μmol O2/citrate synthase activity/mg protein/min pyruvate; control:burn; P < .001 and 3.0 ± .1:.9 ± .03 μmol O2/citrate synthase activity/mg protein/min palmityl CoA; control:burn; P = .003). Uncoupled oxidation was the same between groups. Conclusions: The maximal coupled mitochondrial oxidative capacity is severely impaired after burn injury, although there are no alterations in the rate of uncoupled oxidative capacity. It may be that the ratio of these indicates that a larger portion of energy production in trauma patients is wasted through uncoupling, rather than used for healing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-239
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume196
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2008

Fingerprint

Pyruvic Acid
Citrate (si)-Synthase
Palmitates
Wounds and Injuries
Palmitoyl Coenzyme A
Muscles
Mitochondrial Genes
Thermogenesis
Body Surface Area
Mitochondrial Proteins
Burns
Proteins
Adenosine Triphosphate
Biopsy

Keywords

  • Burn
  • Mitochondria
  • Muscle
  • Trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Cree, M. G., Fram, R. Y., Herndon, D., Qian, T., Angel, C., Green, J. M., ... Wolfe, R. R. (2008). Human mitochondrial oxidative capacity is acutely impaired after burn trauma. American Journal of Surgery, 196(2), 234-239. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2007.09.048

Human mitochondrial oxidative capacity is acutely impaired after burn trauma. / Cree, Melanie G.; Fram, Ricki Y.; Herndon, David; Qian, Ting; Angel, Carlos; Green, Justin M.; Mlcak, Ronald; Aarsland, Asle; Wolfe, Robert R.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 196, No. 2, 08.2008, p. 234-239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cree, MG, Fram, RY, Herndon, D, Qian, T, Angel, C, Green, JM, Mlcak, R, Aarsland, A & Wolfe, RR 2008, 'Human mitochondrial oxidative capacity is acutely impaired after burn trauma', American Journal of Surgery, vol. 196, no. 2, pp. 234-239. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjsurg.2007.09.048
Cree, Melanie G. ; Fram, Ricki Y. ; Herndon, David ; Qian, Ting ; Angel, Carlos ; Green, Justin M. ; Mlcak, Ronald ; Aarsland, Asle ; Wolfe, Robert R. / Human mitochondrial oxidative capacity is acutely impaired after burn trauma. In: American Journal of Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 196, No. 2. pp. 234-239.
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