Hydrogen sulphide and angiogenesis

Mechanisms and applications

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    117 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In vascular tissues, hydrogen sulphide (H 2S) is mainly produced from L-cysteine by the cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) enzyme. Recent studies show that administration of H 2S to endothelial cells in culture stimulates cell proliferation, migration and tube formation. In addition, administration of H 2S to chicken chorioallantoic membranes stimulates blood vessel growth and branching. Furthermore, in vivo administration of H 2S to mice stimulates angiogenesis, as demonstrated in the Matrigel plug assay. Pathways involved in the angiogenic response of H 2S include the PI-3K/Akt pathway, the mitogen activated protein kinase pathway, as well as ATP-sensitive potassium channels. Indirect evidence also suggests that the recently demonstrated role of H 2S as an inhibitor of phosphodiesterases may play an additional role in its pro-angiogenic effect. The endogenous role of H 2S in the angiogenic response has been demonstrated in the chicken chorioallantoic membranes, in endothelial cells in vitro and ex vivo. Importantly, the pro-angiogenic effect of vascular endothelial growth factor (but not of fibroblast growth factor) involves the endogenous production of H 2S. The pro-angiogenic effects of H 2S are also apparent in vivo: in a model of hindlimb ischaemia-induced angiogenesis, H 2S induces a marked pro-angiogenic response; similarly, in a model of coronary ischaemia, H 2S exerts angiogenic effects. Angiogenesis is crucial in the early stage of wound healing. Accordingly, topical administration of H 2S promotes wound healing, whereas genetic ablation of CSE attenuates it. Pharmacological modulation of H 2S-mediated angiogenic pathways may open the door for novel therapeutic approaches.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)853-865
    Number of pages13
    JournalBritish Journal of Pharmacology
    Volume164
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Oct 2011

    Fingerprint

    Chorioallantoic Membrane
    Hydrogen Sulfide
    Wound Healing
    Blood Vessels
    Chickens
    Ischemia
    Endothelial Cells
    Cystathionine gamma-Lyase
    Topical Administration
    KATP Channels
    Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors
    Fibroblast Growth Factors
    Hindlimb
    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
    Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases
    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
    Cell Movement
    Cysteine
    Cell Culture Techniques
    Cell Proliferation

    Keywords

    • blood vessels
    • cell differentiation
    • cell migration
    • cysteine
    • endothelium
    • ischaemia
    • kinases
    • nitric oxide

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pharmacology

    Cite this

    Hydrogen sulphide and angiogenesis : Mechanisms and applications. / Szabo, Csaba; Papapetropoulos, Andreas.

    In: British Journal of Pharmacology, Vol. 164, No. 3, 10.2011, p. 853-865.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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