Hypercarbia depresses cerebral oxygen consumption during cardiopulmonary bypass

Donald Prough, Anne T. Rogers, David A. Stump, Stephen A. Mills, Glenn P. Gravlee, Carol Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

No human studies have systematically examined the relations among PaCO2, cerebral blood flow, and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass. We varied PaCO2 during hypothermie (26-28° C) cardiopulmonary bypass and estimated the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen by multiplying cerebral blood flow (measured using xenon-133 clearance) by the cerebral arteriovenous difference in oxygen contents. Patients were randomly assigned to either of two methods of managing PaCO2 (uncorrected for body temperature). In group 1 (PaCO2 32-48 mm Hg, n=13) the mean±SD cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen was 0.40±0.11 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 36±2.0 mm Hg and 0.40±0.14 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 45±2 mm Hg. In group 2 (PaCO2 49-72 mm Hg, n=12) the mean±SD cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen was 0.31±0.09 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 55±3 mm Hg and 0.21±0.07 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 68±2 mm Hg. Group 2 values differed significantly from those in Group 1 (p<0.05). In both groups, cerebral blood flow increased as PaCO2, increased. During cardiopulmonary bypass, increasing PaCO2 increases cerebral blood flow and decreases the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1162-1166
Number of pages5
JournalStroke
Volume21
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hypercapnia
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Cardiopulmonary Bypass
Oxygen Consumption
Oxygen
Xenon
Body Temperature

Keywords

  • Cardiopulmonary bypass
  • Cerebral blood flow hypercapnia
  • Oxygen consumption

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Prough, D., Rogers, A. T., Stump, D. A., Mills, S. A., Gravlee, G. P., & Taylor, C. (1990). Hypercarbia depresses cerebral oxygen consumption during cardiopulmonary bypass. Stroke, 21(8), 1162-1166.

Hypercarbia depresses cerebral oxygen consumption during cardiopulmonary bypass. / Prough, Donald; Rogers, Anne T.; Stump, David A.; Mills, Stephen A.; Gravlee, Glenn P.; Taylor, Carol.

In: Stroke, Vol. 21, No. 8, 08.1990, p. 1162-1166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Prough, D, Rogers, AT, Stump, DA, Mills, SA, Gravlee, GP & Taylor, C 1990, 'Hypercarbia depresses cerebral oxygen consumption during cardiopulmonary bypass', Stroke, vol. 21, no. 8, pp. 1162-1166.
Prough D, Rogers AT, Stump DA, Mills SA, Gravlee GP, Taylor C. Hypercarbia depresses cerebral oxygen consumption during cardiopulmonary bypass. Stroke. 1990 Aug;21(8):1162-1166.
Prough, Donald ; Rogers, Anne T. ; Stump, David A. ; Mills, Stephen A. ; Gravlee, Glenn P. ; Taylor, Carol. / Hypercarbia depresses cerebral oxygen consumption during cardiopulmonary bypass. In: Stroke. 1990 ; Vol. 21, No. 8. pp. 1162-1166.
@article{e791ba14aaaf4549a1f67d2617448803,
title = "Hypercarbia depresses cerebral oxygen consumption during cardiopulmonary bypass",
abstract = "No human studies have systematically examined the relations among PaCO2, cerebral blood flow, and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass. We varied PaCO2 during hypothermie (26-28° C) cardiopulmonary bypass and estimated the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen by multiplying cerebral blood flow (measured using xenon-133 clearance) by the cerebral arteriovenous difference in oxygen contents. Patients were randomly assigned to either of two methods of managing PaCO2 (uncorrected for body temperature). In group 1 (PaCO2 32-48 mm Hg, n=13) the mean±SD cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen was 0.40±0.11 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 36±2.0 mm Hg and 0.40±0.14 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 45±2 mm Hg. In group 2 (PaCO2 49-72 mm Hg, n=12) the mean±SD cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen was 0.31±0.09 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 55±3 mm Hg and 0.21±0.07 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 68±2 mm Hg. Group 2 values differed significantly from those in Group 1 (p<0.05). In both groups, cerebral blood flow increased as PaCO2, increased. During cardiopulmonary bypass, increasing PaCO2 increases cerebral blood flow and decreases the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen.",
keywords = "Cardiopulmonary bypass, Cerebral blood flow hypercapnia, Oxygen consumption",
author = "Donald Prough and Rogers, {Anne T.} and Stump, {David A.} and Mills, {Stephen A.} and Gravlee, {Glenn P.} and Carol Taylor",
year = "1990",
month = "8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "21",
pages = "1162--1166",
journal = "Stroke",
issn = "0039-2499",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hypercarbia depresses cerebral oxygen consumption during cardiopulmonary bypass

AU - Prough, Donald

AU - Rogers, Anne T.

AU - Stump, David A.

AU - Mills, Stephen A.

AU - Gravlee, Glenn P.

AU - Taylor, Carol

PY - 1990/8

Y1 - 1990/8

N2 - No human studies have systematically examined the relations among PaCO2, cerebral blood flow, and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass. We varied PaCO2 during hypothermie (26-28° C) cardiopulmonary bypass and estimated the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen by multiplying cerebral blood flow (measured using xenon-133 clearance) by the cerebral arteriovenous difference in oxygen contents. Patients were randomly assigned to either of two methods of managing PaCO2 (uncorrected for body temperature). In group 1 (PaCO2 32-48 mm Hg, n=13) the mean±SD cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen was 0.40±0.11 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 36±2.0 mm Hg and 0.40±0.14 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 45±2 mm Hg. In group 2 (PaCO2 49-72 mm Hg, n=12) the mean±SD cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen was 0.31±0.09 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 55±3 mm Hg and 0.21±0.07 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 68±2 mm Hg. Group 2 values differed significantly from those in Group 1 (p<0.05). In both groups, cerebral blood flow increased as PaCO2, increased. During cardiopulmonary bypass, increasing PaCO2 increases cerebral blood flow and decreases the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen.

AB - No human studies have systematically examined the relations among PaCO2, cerebral blood flow, and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass. We varied PaCO2 during hypothermie (26-28° C) cardiopulmonary bypass and estimated the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen by multiplying cerebral blood flow (measured using xenon-133 clearance) by the cerebral arteriovenous difference in oxygen contents. Patients were randomly assigned to either of two methods of managing PaCO2 (uncorrected for body temperature). In group 1 (PaCO2 32-48 mm Hg, n=13) the mean±SD cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen was 0.40±0.11 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 36±2.0 mm Hg and 0.40±0.14 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 45±2 mm Hg. In group 2 (PaCO2 49-72 mm Hg, n=12) the mean±SD cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen was 0.31±0.09 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 55±3 mm Hg and 0.21±0.07 ml O2×100 g-1×min-1 at a mean±SD PaCO2 of 68±2 mm Hg. Group 2 values differed significantly from those in Group 1 (p<0.05). In both groups, cerebral blood flow increased as PaCO2, increased. During cardiopulmonary bypass, increasing PaCO2 increases cerebral blood flow and decreases the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen.

KW - Cardiopulmonary bypass

KW - Cerebral blood flow hypercapnia

KW - Oxygen consumption

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025029817&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025029817&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2117784

AN - SCOPUS:0025029817

VL - 21

SP - 1162

EP - 1166

JO - Stroke

JF - Stroke

SN - 0039-2499

IS - 8

ER -