Hypoproteinemia does not alter plasma volume expansion in response to a 0.9% saline bolus in awake sheep

Kirk I. Brauer, Lance P. Brauer, Donald Prough, Peter Rodhe, Robert G. Hahn, Daniel L. Traber, Lilian D. Traber, Christer H. Svensen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To test the hypothesis that hypoproteinemia reduces plasma volume expansion produced by a bolus of crystalloid solution given to awake sheep. Design: Prospective and observational. Setting: Laboratory. Subjects: Five female merino sheep (n = 5) weighing 37 ± 3 kg were anesthetized. Interventions: Each animal was subjected to a 5-day test period: day 1: 50 mL/min 0.9% saline infusion over 20 mins. Days 2-4: daily plasmapheresis and replacement of the shed plasma with 6 L of 0.9% saline were performed in increments. Measurements and main results: Fractional plasma volume expansion after rapid infusion of saline on days 1 and 5 was calculated from changes in hemoglobin concentration. There was a significant reduction in total plasma protein concentration after plasmapheresis (p <.05). Colloid osmotic pressures were also significantly lowered (p <.05). A crystalloid infusion of 0.9% saline did not alter any of these values compared with baseline. The hemodynamic measurements did not show significant differences between the experiments. The plasma volume expansion reached approximately 20% at the end of infusion and stayed at 10-15% during the experiments. No difference was found in plasma volume expansion produced by a bolus of 50 mL/min of 0.9% in the hypoproteinemic state when compared with the euproteinemic state (p =.61). No difference in cumulative urinary output was found between the two states. Conclusions: In contrast to our hypothesis, severe acute hypoproteinemia does not reduce plasma volume expansion in response to 50 mL/min 0.9% saline infusion in nonspleenectomized sheep when compared with the resultant plasma volume expansion after a 50 mL/min of 0.9% infusion in the euproteinemic state.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2011-2015
Number of pages5
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume38
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

Fingerprint

Hypoproteinemia
Plasma Volume
Sheep
Plasmapheresis
Osmotic Pressure
Colloids
Blood Proteins
Hemoglobins
Hemodynamics

Keywords

  • anesthesia
  • crystalloids
  • fluid distribution
  • hypoproteinemia
  • plasma volume expansion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hypoproteinemia does not alter plasma volume expansion in response to a 0.9% saline bolus in awake sheep. / Brauer, Kirk I.; Brauer, Lance P.; Prough, Donald; Rodhe, Peter; Hahn, Robert G.; Traber, Daniel L.; Traber, Lilian D.; Svensen, Christer H.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 38, No. 10, 10.2010, p. 2011-2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brauer, KI, Brauer, LP, Prough, D, Rodhe, P, Hahn, RG, Traber, DL, Traber, LD & Svensen, CH 2010, 'Hypoproteinemia does not alter plasma volume expansion in response to a 0.9% saline bolus in awake sheep', Critical Care Medicine, vol. 38, no. 10, pp. 2011-2015. https://doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0b013e3181ef45e2
Brauer, Kirk I. ; Brauer, Lance P. ; Prough, Donald ; Rodhe, Peter ; Hahn, Robert G. ; Traber, Daniel L. ; Traber, Lilian D. ; Svensen, Christer H. / Hypoproteinemia does not alter plasma volume expansion in response to a 0.9% saline bolus in awake sheep. In: Critical Care Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 38, No. 10. pp. 2011-2015.
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title = "Hypoproteinemia does not alter plasma volume expansion in response to a 0.9{\%} saline bolus in awake sheep",
abstract = "Objective: To test the hypothesis that hypoproteinemia reduces plasma volume expansion produced by a bolus of crystalloid solution given to awake sheep. Design: Prospective and observational. Setting: Laboratory. Subjects: Five female merino sheep (n = 5) weighing 37 ± 3 kg were anesthetized. Interventions: Each animal was subjected to a 5-day test period: day 1: 50 mL/min 0.9{\%} saline infusion over 20 mins. Days 2-4: daily plasmapheresis and replacement of the shed plasma with 6 L of 0.9{\%} saline were performed in increments. Measurements and main results: Fractional plasma volume expansion after rapid infusion of saline on days 1 and 5 was calculated from changes in hemoglobin concentration. There was a significant reduction in total plasma protein concentration after plasmapheresis (p <.05). Colloid osmotic pressures were also significantly lowered (p <.05). A crystalloid infusion of 0.9{\%} saline did not alter any of these values compared with baseline. The hemodynamic measurements did not show significant differences between the experiments. The plasma volume expansion reached approximately 20{\%} at the end of infusion and stayed at 10-15{\%} during the experiments. No difference was found in plasma volume expansion produced by a bolus of 50 mL/min of 0.9{\%} in the hypoproteinemic state when compared with the euproteinemic state (p =.61). No difference in cumulative urinary output was found between the two states. Conclusions: In contrast to our hypothesis, severe acute hypoproteinemia does not reduce plasma volume expansion in response to 50 mL/min 0.9{\%} saline infusion in nonspleenectomized sheep when compared with the resultant plasma volume expansion after a 50 mL/min of 0.9{\%} infusion in the euproteinemic state.",
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T1 - Hypoproteinemia does not alter plasma volume expansion in response to a 0.9% saline bolus in awake sheep

AU - Brauer, Kirk I.

AU - Brauer, Lance P.

AU - Prough, Donald

AU - Rodhe, Peter

AU - Hahn, Robert G.

AU - Traber, Daniel L.

AU - Traber, Lilian D.

AU - Svensen, Christer H.

PY - 2010/10

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N2 - Objective: To test the hypothesis that hypoproteinemia reduces plasma volume expansion produced by a bolus of crystalloid solution given to awake sheep. Design: Prospective and observational. Setting: Laboratory. Subjects: Five female merino sheep (n = 5) weighing 37 ± 3 kg were anesthetized. Interventions: Each animal was subjected to a 5-day test period: day 1: 50 mL/min 0.9% saline infusion over 20 mins. Days 2-4: daily plasmapheresis and replacement of the shed plasma with 6 L of 0.9% saline were performed in increments. Measurements and main results: Fractional plasma volume expansion after rapid infusion of saline on days 1 and 5 was calculated from changes in hemoglobin concentration. There was a significant reduction in total plasma protein concentration after plasmapheresis (p <.05). Colloid osmotic pressures were also significantly lowered (p <.05). A crystalloid infusion of 0.9% saline did not alter any of these values compared with baseline. The hemodynamic measurements did not show significant differences between the experiments. The plasma volume expansion reached approximately 20% at the end of infusion and stayed at 10-15% during the experiments. No difference was found in plasma volume expansion produced by a bolus of 50 mL/min of 0.9% in the hypoproteinemic state when compared with the euproteinemic state (p =.61). No difference in cumulative urinary output was found between the two states. Conclusions: In contrast to our hypothesis, severe acute hypoproteinemia does not reduce plasma volume expansion in response to 50 mL/min 0.9% saline infusion in nonspleenectomized sheep when compared with the resultant plasma volume expansion after a 50 mL/min of 0.9% infusion in the euproteinemic state.

AB - Objective: To test the hypothesis that hypoproteinemia reduces plasma volume expansion produced by a bolus of crystalloid solution given to awake sheep. Design: Prospective and observational. Setting: Laboratory. Subjects: Five female merino sheep (n = 5) weighing 37 ± 3 kg were anesthetized. Interventions: Each animal was subjected to a 5-day test period: day 1: 50 mL/min 0.9% saline infusion over 20 mins. Days 2-4: daily plasmapheresis and replacement of the shed plasma with 6 L of 0.9% saline were performed in increments. Measurements and main results: Fractional plasma volume expansion after rapid infusion of saline on days 1 and 5 was calculated from changes in hemoglobin concentration. There was a significant reduction in total plasma protein concentration after plasmapheresis (p <.05). Colloid osmotic pressures were also significantly lowered (p <.05). A crystalloid infusion of 0.9% saline did not alter any of these values compared with baseline. The hemodynamic measurements did not show significant differences between the experiments. The plasma volume expansion reached approximately 20% at the end of infusion and stayed at 10-15% during the experiments. No difference was found in plasma volume expansion produced by a bolus of 50 mL/min of 0.9% in the hypoproteinemic state when compared with the euproteinemic state (p =.61). No difference in cumulative urinary output was found between the two states. Conclusions: In contrast to our hypothesis, severe acute hypoproteinemia does not reduce plasma volume expansion in response to 50 mL/min 0.9% saline infusion in nonspleenectomized sheep when compared with the resultant plasma volume expansion after a 50 mL/min of 0.9% infusion in the euproteinemic state.

KW - anesthesia

KW - crystalloids

KW - fluid distribution

KW - hypoproteinemia

KW - plasma volume expansion

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